Chapter 25 MySQL sys Schema

MySQL 5.7.7 and higher includes the sys schema, a set of objects that helps DBAs and developers interpret data collected by the Performance Schema. sys schema objects can be used for typical tuning and diagnosis use cases. Objects in this schema include:

  • Views that summarize Performance Schema data into more easily understandable form.

  • Stored procedures that perform operations such as Performance Schema configuration and generating diagnostic reports.

  • Stored functions that query Performance Schema configuration and provide formatting services.

For new installations, the sys schema is installed by default during data directory initialization if you use mysqld with the --initialize or --initialize-insecure option, or if you use mysql_install_db. To permit this behavior to be suppressed, mysql_install_db has a --skip-sys-schema option. mysqld has no such option, but if you initialize the data directory using mysqld --initialize (or --initialize-insecure) rather than mysql_install_db, you can drop the sys schema manually after initialization if it is unneeded.

For upgrades, mysql_upgrade installs the sys schema if it is not installed, and upgrades it to the current version otherwise. To permit this behavior to be suppressed, mysql_upgrade has a --skip-sys-schema option.

mysql_upgrade returns an error if a sys schema exists but has no version view, on the assumption that absence of this view indicates a user-created sys schema. To upgrade in this case, remove or rename the existing sys schema first.

As of MySQL 5.7.9, sys schema objects have a DEFINER of 'mysql.sys'@'localhost'. (Before MySQL 5.7.9, the DEFINER is 'root'@'localhost'.) Use of the dedicated mysql.sys account avoids problems that occur if a DBA renames or removes the root account.

25.1 Prerequisites for Using the sys Schema

Before using the sys schema, the prerequisites described in this section must be satisfied.

The sys schema requires MySQL 5.6 or higher.

Because the sys schema provides an alternative means of accessing the Performance Schema, the Performance Schema must be enabled for the sys schema to work. See Section 24.2.2, “Performance Schema Startup Configuration”.

For full access to the sys schema, a user must have these privileges:

  • SELECT on all sys tables and views

  • EXECUTE on all sys stored procedures and functions

  • INSERT and UPDATE for the sys_config table, if changes are to be made to it

  • Additional privileges for certain sys schema stored procedures and functions, as noted in their descriptions; for example, the ps_setup_save() procedure

It is also necessary to have privileges for the objects underlying the sys schema objects:

Certain Performance Schema instruments and consumers must be enabled and (for instruments) timed to take full advantage of sys schema capabilities:

  • All wait instruments

  • All stage instruments

  • All statement instruments

  • xxx_current and xxx_history_long consumers for all events

You can use the sys schema itself to enable all of the additional instruments and consumers:

CALL sys.ps_setup_enable_instrument('wait');
CALL sys.ps_setup_enable_instrument('stage');
CALL sys.ps_setup_enable_instrument('statement');
CALL sys.ps_setup_enable_consumer('current');
CALL sys.ps_setup_enable_consumer('history_long');
Note

For many uses of the sys schema, the default Performance Schema is sufficient for data collection. Enabling all the instruments and consumers just mentioned has a performance impact, so it is preferable to enable only the additional configuration you need. Also, remember that if you enable additional configuration, you can easily restore the default configuration like this:

CALL sys.ps_setup_reset_to_default(TRUE);

25.2 Using the sys Schema

You can make the sys schema the default schema so that references to its objects need not be qualified with the schema name:

mysql> USE sys;
Database changed
mysql> SELECT * FROM version;
+-------------+-----------------+
| sys_version | mysql_version   |
+-------------+-----------------+
| 1.5.0       | 5.7.9-debug-log |
+-------------+-----------------+

(The version view shows the sys schema and MySQL server versions.)

To access sys schema objects while a different schema is the default (or simply to be explicit), qualify object references with the schema name:

mysql> SELECT * FROM sys.version;
+-------------+-----------------+
| sys_version | mysql_version   |
+-------------+-----------------+
| 1.5.0       | 5.7.9-debug-log |
+-------------+-----------------+

Examples in this chapter usually assume sys as the default schema.

The sys schema contains many views that summarize Performance Schema tables in various ways. Most of these views come in pairs, such that one member of the pair has the same name as the other member, plus a x$ prefix. For example, the host_summary_by_file_io view summarizes file I/O grouped by host and displays latencies converted from picoseconds to more readable values (with units);

mysql> SELECT * FROM host_summary_by_file_io;
+------------+-------+------------+
| host       | ios   | io_latency |
+------------+-------+------------+
| localhost  | 67570 | 5.38 s     |
| background |  3468 | 4.18 s     |
+------------+-------+------------+

The x$host_summary_by_file_io view summarizes the same data but displays unformatted picosecond latencies:

mysql> SELECT * FROM x$host_summary_by_file_io;
+------------+-------+---------------+
| host       | ios   | io_latency    |
+------------+-------+---------------+
| localhost  | 67574 | 5380678125144 |
| background |  3474 | 4758696829416 |
+------------+-------+---------------+

The view without the x$ prefix is intended to provide output that is more user friendly and easier for humans to read. The view with the x$ prefix that displays the same values in raw form is intended more for use with other tools that perform their own processing on the data. For additional information about the differences between non-x$ and x$ views, see Section 25.4.3, “sys Schema Views”.

To examine sys schema object definitions, use the appropriate SHOW statement or INFORMATION_SCHEMA query. For example, to examine the definitions of the session view and format_bytes() function, use these statements:

mysql> SHOW CREATE VIEW session;
mysql> SHOW CREATE FUNCTION format_bytes;

However, those statements display the definitions in relatively unformatted form. To view object definitions with more readable formatting, access the individual .sql files available from the sys schema development web site at https://github.com/mysql/mysql-sys.

Neither mysqldump nor mysqlpump dump the sys schema by default. To generate a dump file, name the sys schema explicitly on the command line using either of these commands:

mysqldump --databases --routines sys > sys_dump.sql
mysqlpump sys > sys_dump.sql

To reinstall the schema from the dump file, use this command:

mysql < sys_dump.sql

25.3 sys Schema Progress Reporting

As of MySQL 5.7.9, the following sys schema views provide progress reporting for long-running transactions:

processlist
session
x$processlist
x$session

Assuming that the required instruments and consumers are enabled, the progress column of these views shows the percentage of work completed for stages that support progress reporting.

Stage progress reporting requires that the events_stages_current consumer be enabled, as well as the instruments for which progress information is desired. Instruments for these stages currently support progress reporting:

stage/sql/Copying to tmp table
stage/innodb/alter table (end)
stage/innodb/alter table (flush)
stage/innodb/alter table (insert)
stage/innodb/alter table (log apply index)
stage/innodb/alter table (log apply table)
stage/innodb/alter table (merge sort)
stage/innodb/alter table (read PK and internal sort)
stage/innodb/buffer pool load

For stages that do not support estimated and completed work reporting, or if the required instruments or consumers are not enabled, the progress column is NULL.

25.4 sys Schema Object Reference

The sys schema includes tables and triggers, views, and stored procedures and functions. The following sections provide details for each of these objects.

25.4.1 sys Schema Object Index

The following tables list sys schema objects and provide a short description of each one.

Table 25.1 sys Schema Tables and Triggers

Table or Trigger Name Description
sys_config sys schema configuration options
sys_config_insert_set_user sys_config insert trigger
sys_config_update_set_user sys_config update trigger

Table 25.2 sys Schema Views

View Name Description
host_summary, x$host_summary Statement activity, file I/O, and connections, grouped by host
host_summary_by_file_io, x$host_summary_by_file_io File I/O, grouped by host
host_summary_by_file_io_type, x$host_summary_by_file_io_type File I/O, grouped by host and event type
host_summary_by_stages, x$host_summary_by_stages Statement stages, grouped by host
host_summary_by_statement_latency, x$host_summary_by_statement_latency Statement statistics, grouped by host
host_summary_by_statement_type, x$host_summary_by_statement_type Statements executed, grouped by host and statement
innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema, x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema InnoDB buffer information, grouped by schema
innodb_buffer_stats_by_table, x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_table InnoDB buffer information, grouped by schema and table
innodb_lock_waits, x$innodb_lock_waits InnoDB lock information
io_by_thread_by_latency, x$io_by_thread_by_latency I/O consumers, grouped by thread
io_global_by_file_by_bytes, x$io_global_by_file_by_bytes Global I/O consumers, grouped by file and bytes
io_global_by_file_by_latency, x$io_global_by_file_by_latency Global I/O consumers, grouped by file and latency
io_global_by_wait_by_bytes, x$io_global_by_wait_by_bytes Global I/O consumers, grouped by bytes
io_global_by_wait_by_latency, x$io_global_by_wait_by_latency Global I/O consumers, grouped by latency
latest_file_io, x$latest_file_io Most recent I/O, grouped by file and thread
memory_by_host_by_current_bytes, x$memory_by_host_by_current_bytes Memory use, grouped by host
memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes, x$memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes Memory use, grouped by thread
memory_by_user_by_current_bytes, x$memory_by_user_by_current_bytes Memory use, grouped by user
memory_global_by_current_bytes, x$memory_global_by_current_bytes Memory use, grouped by allocation type
memory_global_total, x$memory_global_total Total memory use
metrics Server metrics
processlist, x$processlist Processlist information
ps_check_lost_instrumentation Variables that have lost instruments
schema_auto_increment_columns AUTO_INCREMENT column information
schema_index_statistics, x$schema_index_statistics Index statistics
schema_object_overview Types of objects within each schema
schema_redundant_indexes Duplicate or redundant indexes
schema_table_lock_waits, x$schema_table_lock_waits Sessions waiting for metadata locks
schema_table_statistics, x$schema_table_statistics Table statistics
schema_table_statistics_with_buffer, x$schema_table_statistics_with_buffer Table statistics, including InnoDB buffer pool statistics
schema_tables_with_full_table_scans, x$schema_tables_with_full_table_scans Tables being accessed with full scans
schema_unused_indexes Indexes not in active use
session, x$session Processlist information for user sessions
session_ssl_status Connection SSL information
statement_analysis, x$statement_analysis Statement aggregate statistics
statements_with_errors_or_warnings, x$statements_with_errors_or_warnings Statements that have produced errors or warnings
statements_with_full_table_scans, x$statements_with_full_table_scans Statements that have done full table scans
statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile, x$statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile Statements with highest average runtime
statements_with_sorting, x$statements_with_sorting Statements that performed sorts
statements_with_temp_tables, x$statements_with_temp_tables Statements that used temporary tables
user_summary, x$user_summary User statement and connection activity
user_summary_by_file_io, x$user_summary_by_file_io File I/O, grouped by user
user_summary_by_file_io_type, x$user_summary_by_file_io_type File I/O, grouped by user and event
user_summary_by_stages, x$user_summary_by_stages Stage events, grouped by user
user_summary_by_statement_latency, x$user_summary_by_statement_latency Statement statistics, grouped by user
user_summary_by_statement_type, x$user_summary_by_statement_type Statements executed, grouped by user and statement
version Current sys schema and MySQL server versions
wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency, x$wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency Wait class average latency, grouped by event class
wait_classes_global_by_latency, x$wait_classes_global_by_latency Wait class total latency, grouped by event class
waits_by_host_by_latency, x$waits_by_host_by_latency Wait events, grouped by host and event
waits_by_user_by_latency, x$waits_by_user_by_latency Wait events, grouped by user and event
waits_global_by_latency, x$waits_global_by_latency Wait events, grouped by event
x$ps_digest_95th_percentile_by_avg_us Helper view for 95th-percentile views
x$ps_digest_avg_latency_distribution Helper view for 95th-percentile views
x$ps_schema_table_statistics_io Helper view for table-statistics views
x$schema_flattened_keys Helper view for schema_redundant_indexes

Table 25.3 sys Schema Stored Procedures

Procedure Name Description
create_synonym_db() Create synonym for schema
diagnostics() Collect system diagnostic information
execute_prepared_stmt() Execute prepared statement
ps_setup_disable_background_threads() Disable background thread instrumentation
ps_setup_disable_consumer() Disable consumers
ps_setup_disable_instrument() Disable instruments
ps_setup_disable_thread() Disable instrumentation for thread
ps_setup_enable_background_threads() Enable background thread instrumentation
ps_setup_enable_consumer() Enable consumers
ps_setup_enable_instrument() Enable instruments
ps_setup_enable_thread() Enable instrumentation for thread
ps_setup_reload_saved() Reload saved Performance Schema configuration
ps_setup_reset_to_default() Reset saved Performance Schema configuration
ps_setup_save() Save Performance Schema configuration
ps_setup_show_disabled() Display disabled Performance Schema configuration
ps_setup_show_disabled_consumers() Display disabled Performance Schema consumers
ps_setup_show_disabled_instruments() Display disabled Performance Schema instruments
ps_setup_show_enabled() Display enabled Performance Schema configuration
ps_setup_show_enabled_consumers() Display enabled Performance Schema consumers
ps_setup_show_enabled_instruments() Display enabled Performance Schema instruments
ps_statement_avg_latency_histogram() Display statement latency histogram
ps_trace_statement_digest() Trace Performance Schema instrumentation for digest
ps_trace_thread() Dump Performance Schema data for thread
ps_truncate_all_tables() Truncate Performance Schema summary tables
statement_performance_analyzer() Report of statements running on server
table_exists() Whether a table exists

Table 25.4 sys Schema Stored Functions

Function Name Description
extract_schema_from_file_name() Extract schema name from file path name
extract_table_from_file_name() Extract table name from file path name
format_bytes() Convert byte value to value with units
format_path() Replace data and temp-file directories in path name with symbolic values
format_statement() Truncate long statement to fixed length
format_time() Convert picoseconds value to value with units
list_add() Add item to list
list_drop() Remove item from list
ps_is_account_enabled() Check whether account instrumentation is enabled
ps_is_consumer_enabled() Check whether consumer is enabled
ps_is_instrument_default_enabled() Check whether instrument is enabled
ps_is_instrument_default_timed() Check whether instrument is timed
ps_is_thread_instrumented() Check whether thread is instrumented
ps_thread_account() Return account for thread ID
ps_thread_id() Return thread ID for connection ID
ps_thread_stack() Return event information for thread ID
ps_thread_trx_info() Return transaction information for thread ID
quote_identifier() Return string as quoted identifier
sys_get_config() Return sys schema configuration option
version_major() MySQL server major version number
version_minor() MySQL server minor version number
version_patch() MySQL server patch release version number

25.4.2 sys Schema Tables and Triggers

The following sections describe sys schema tables and triggers.

25.4.2.1 The sys_config Table

This table contains sys schema configuration options, one row per option. Configuration changes made by updating this table persist across client sessions and server restarts.

The sys_config table has these columns:

  • variable

    The configuration option name.

  • value

    The configuration option value.

  • set_time

    The timestamp of the most recent modification to the row.

  • set_by

    The account that made the most recent modification to the row. The value is NULL if the row has not been changed since the sys schema was installed.

As an efficiency measure to minimize the number of direct reads from the sys_config table, sys schema functions that use a value from this table check for a user-defined variable with a corresponding name, which is the user-defined variable having the same name plus a @sys. prefix. (For example, the variable corresponding to the diagnostics.include_raw option is @sys.diagnostics.include_raw.) If the user-defined variable exists in the current session and is non-NULL, the function uses its value in preference to the value in the sys_config table. Otherwise, the function reads and uses the value from the table. In the latter case, the calling function conventionally also sets the corresponding user-defined variable to the table value so that further references to the configuration option within the same session use the variable and need not read the table again.

For example, the statement_truncate_len option controls the maximum length of statements returned by the format_statement() function. The default is 64. To temporarily change the value to 32 for your current session, set the corresponding @sys.statement_truncate_len user-defined variable:

mysql> SET @stmt = 'SELECT variable, value, set_time, set_by FROM sys_config';
mysql> SELECT format_statement(@stmt);
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| format_statement(@stmt)                                  |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| SELECT variable, value, set_time, set_by FROM sys_config |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
mysql> SET @sys.statement_truncate_len = 32;
mysql> SELECT format_statement(@stmt);
+-----------------------------------+
| format_statement(@stmt)           |
+-----------------------------------+
| SELECT variabl ... ROM sys_config |
+-----------------------------------+

Subsequent invocations of format_statement() within the session continue to use the user-defined variable value (32), rather than the value stored in the table (64).

To stop using the user-defined variable and revert to using the value in the table, set the variable to NULL within your session:

mysql> SET @sys.statement_truncate_len = NULL;
mysql> SELECT format_statement(@stmt);
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| format_statement(@stmt)                                  |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| SELECT variable, value, set_time, set_by FROM sys_config |
+----------------------------------------------------------+

Alternatively, end your current session (causing the user-defined variable to no longer exist) and begin a new session.

The conventional relationship just described between options in the sys_config table and user-defined variables can be exploited to make temporary configuration changes that end when your session ends. However, if you set a user-defined variable and then subsequently change the corresponding table value within the same session, the changed table value will not be used in that session as long as the user-defined variable exists with a non-NULL value. (The changed table value will be used in other sessions that do not have the user-defined variable assigned.)

The following list describes the options in the sys_config table and the corresponding user-defined variables:

  • diagnostics.allow_i_s_tables, @sys.diagnostics.allow_i_s_tables

    If this option is ON, the diagnostics() procedure is permitted to perform table scans on the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES table. This can be expensive if there are many tables. The default is OFF.

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • diagnostics.include_raw, @sys.diagnostics.include_raw

    If this option is ON, the diagnostics() procedure includes the raw output from querying the metrics view. The default is OFF.

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • ps_thread_trx_info.max_length, @sys.ps_thread_trx_info.max_length

    The maximum length for JSON output produced by the ps_thread_trx_info() function. The default is 65535.

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • statement_performance_analyzer.limit, @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.limit

    The maximum number of rows to return for views that have no built-in limit. (For example, the statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile view has a built-in limit in the sense that it returns only statements with average execution time in the 95th percentile.) The default is 100.

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • statement_performance_analyzer.view, @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.view

    The custom query or view to be used by the statement_performance_analyzer() procedure (which is itself invoked by the diagnostics() procedure). If the option value contains a space, it is interpreted as a query. Otherwise, it must be the name of an existing view that queries the Performance Schema events_statements_summary_by_digest table. There cannot be any LIMIT clause in the query or view definition if the statement_performance_analyzer.limit configuration option is greater than 0. The default is NULL (no custom view defined).

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • statement_truncate_len, @sys.statement_truncate_len

    The maximum length of statements returned by the format_statement() function. Longer statements are truncated to this length. The default is 64.

Other options can be added to the sys_config table. For example, the diagnostics() and execute_prepared_stmt() procedures use the debug option if it exists, but this option is not part of the sys_config table by default because debug output normally is enabled only temporarily, by setting the corresponding @sys.debug user-defined variable. To enable debug output without having to set that variable in individual sessions, add the option to the table:

mysql> INSERT INTO sys_config (variable, value) VALUES('debug', 'ON');

To change the debug setting in the table, do two things. First, modify the value in the table itself:

mysql> UPDATE sys_config SET value = 'OFF' WHERE variable = 'debug';

Second, to also ensure that procedure invocations within the current session use the changed value from the table, set the corresponding user-defined variable to NULL:

mysql> SET @sys.debug = NULL;

25.4.2.2 The sys_config_insert_set_user Trigger

For rows added to the sys_config table by INSERT statements, the sys_config_insert_set_user trigger sets the set_by column to the current user.

25.4.2.3 The sys_config_update_set_user Trigger

The sys_config_update_set_user trigger for the sys_config table is similar to the sys_config_insert_set_user trigger, but for UPDATE statements.

25.4.3 sys Schema Views

25.4.3.1 The host_summary and x$host_summary Views
25.4.3.2 The host_summary_by_file_io and x$host_summary_by_file_io Views
25.4.3.3 The host_summary_by_file_io_type and x$host_summary_by_file_io_type Views
25.4.3.4 The host_summary_by_stages and x$host_summary_by_stages Views
25.4.3.5 The host_summary_by_statement_latency and x$host_summary_by_statement_latency Views
25.4.3.6 The host_summary_by_statement_type and x$host_summary_by_statement_type Views
25.4.3.7 The innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema Views
25.4.3.8 The innodb_buffer_stats_by_table and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_table Views
25.4.3.9 The innodb_lock_waits and x$innodb_lock_waits Views
25.4.3.10 The io_by_thread_by_latency and x$io_by_thread_by_latency Views
25.4.3.11 The io_global_by_file_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_file_by_bytes Views
25.4.3.12 The io_global_by_file_by_latency and x$io_global_by_file_by_latency Views
25.4.3.13 The io_global_by_wait_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_wait_by_bytes Views
25.4.3.14 The io_global_by_wait_by_latency and x$io_global_by_wait_by_latency Views
25.4.3.15 The latest_file_io and x$latest_file_io Views
25.4.3.16 The memory_by_host_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_host_by_current_bytes Views
25.4.3.17 The memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes Views
25.4.3.18 The memory_by_user_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_user_by_current_bytes Views
25.4.3.19 The memory_global_by_current_bytes and x$memory_global_by_current_bytes Views
25.4.3.20 The memory_global_total and x$memory_global_total Views
25.4.3.21 The metrics View
25.4.3.22 The processlist and x$processlist Views
25.4.3.23 The ps_check_lost_instrumentation View
25.4.3.24 The schema_auto_increment_columns View
25.4.3.25 The schema_index_statistics and x$schema_index_statistics Views
25.4.3.26 The schema_object_overview View
25.4.3.27 The schema_redundant_indexes and x$schema_flattened_keys Views
25.4.3.28 The schema_table_lock_waits and x$schema_table_lock_waits Views
25.4.3.29 The schema_table_statistics and x$schema_table_statistics Views
25.4.3.30 The schema_table_statistics_with_buffer and x$schema_table_statistics_with_buffer Views
25.4.3.31 The schema_tables_with_full_table_scans and x$schema_tables_with_full_table_scans Views
25.4.3.32 The schema_unused_indexes View
25.4.3.33 The session and x$session Views
25.4.3.34 The session_ssl_status View
25.4.3.35 The statement_analysis and x$statement_analysis Views
25.4.3.36 The statements_with_errors_or_warnings and x$statements_with_errors_or_warnings Views
25.4.3.37 The statements_with_full_table_scans and x$statements_with_full_table_scans Views
25.4.3.38 The statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile and x$statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile Views
25.4.3.39 The statements_with_sorting and x$statements_with_sorting Views
25.4.3.40 The statements_with_temp_tables and x$statements_with_temp_tables Views
25.4.3.41 The user_summary and x$user_summary Views
25.4.3.42 The user_summary_by_file_io and x$user_summary_by_file_io Views
25.4.3.43 The user_summary_by_file_io_type and x$user_summary_by_file_io_type Views
25.4.3.44 The user_summary_by_stages and x$user_summary_by_stages Views
25.4.3.45 The user_summary_by_statement_latency and x$user_summary_by_statement_latency Views
25.4.3.46 The user_summary_by_statement_type and x$user_summary_by_statement_type Views
25.4.3.47 The version View
25.4.3.48 The wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency Views
25.4.3.49 The wait_classes_global_by_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_latency Views
25.4.3.50 The waits_by_host_by_latency and x$waits_by_host_by_latency Views
25.4.3.51 The waits_by_user_by_latency and x$waits_by_user_by_latency Views
25.4.3.52 The waits_global_by_latency and x$waits_global_by_latency Views

The following sections describe sys schema views.

The sys schema contains many views that summarize Performance Schema tables in various ways. Most of these views come in pairs, such that one member of the pair has the same name as the other member, plus a x$ prefix. For example, the host_summary_by_file_io view summarizes file I/O grouped by host and displays latencies converted from picoseconds to more readable values (with units);

mysql> SELECT * FROM host_summary_by_file_io;
+------------+-------+------------+
| host       | ios   | io_latency |
+------------+-------+------------+
| localhost  | 67570 | 5.38 s     |
| background |  3468 | 4.18 s     |
+------------+-------+------------+

The x$host_summary_by_file_io view summarizes the same data but displays unformatted picosecond latencies:

mysql> SELECT * FROM x$host_summary_by_file_io;
+------------+-------+---------------+
| host       | ios   | io_latency    |
+------------+-------+---------------+
| localhost  | 67574 | 5380678125144 |
| background |  3474 | 4758696829416 |
+------------+-------+---------------+

The view without the x$ prefix is intended to provide output that is more user friendly and easier to read. The view with the x$ prefix that displays the same values in raw form is intended more for use with other tools that perform their own processing on the data.

Views without the x$ prefix differ from the corresponding x$ views in these ways:

25.4.3.1 The host_summary and x$host_summary Views

These views summarize statement activity, file I/O, and connections, grouped by host.

The host_summary and x$host_summary views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • statements

    The total number of statements for the host.

  • statement_latency

    The total wait time of timed statements for the host.

  • statement_avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed statement for the host.

  • table_scans

    The total number of table scans for the host.

  • file_ios

    The total number of file I/O events for the host.

  • file_io_latency

    The total wait time of timed file I/O events for the host.

  • current_connections

    The current number of connections for the host.

  • total_connections

    The total number of connections for the host.

  • unique_users

    The number of distinct users for the host.

  • current_memory

    The current amount of allocated memory for the host.

  • total_memory_allocated

    The total amount of allocated memory for the host.

25.4.3.2 The host_summary_by_file_io and x$host_summary_by_file_io Views

These views summarize file I/O, grouped by host. By default, rows are sorted by descending total file I/O latency.

The host_summary_by_file_io and x$host_summary_by_file_io views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • ios

    The total number of file I/O events for the host.

  • io_latency

    The total wait time of timed file I/O events for the host.

25.4.3.3 The host_summary_by_file_io_type and x$host_summary_by_file_io_type Views

These views summarize file I/O, grouped by host and event type. By default, rows are sorted by host and descending total I/O latency.

The host_summary_by_file_io_type and x$host_summary_by_file_io_type views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • event_name

    The file I/O event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the file I/O event for the host.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the file I/O event for the host.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the file I/O event for the host.

25.4.3.4 The host_summary_by_stages and x$host_summary_by_stages Views

These views summarize statement stages, grouped by host. By default, rows are sorted by host and descending total latency.

The host_summary_by_stages and x$host_summary_by_stages views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • event_name

    The stage event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the stage event for the host.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the stage event for the host.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the stage event for the host.

25.4.3.5 The host_summary_by_statement_latency and x$host_summary_by_statement_latency Views

These views summarize overall statement statistics, grouped by host. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The host_summary_by_statement_latency and x$host_summary_by_statement_latency views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • total

    The total number of statements for the host.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed statements for the host.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed statements for the host.

  • lock_latency

    The total time waiting for locks by timed statements for the host.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by statements for the host.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by statements for the host.

  • rows_affected

    The total number of rows affected by statements for the host.

  • full_scans

    The total number of full table scans by statements for the host.

25.4.3.6 The host_summary_by_statement_type and x$host_summary_by_statement_type Views

These views summarize informaion about statements executed, grouped by host and statement type. By default, rows are sorted by host and descending total latency.

The host_summary_by_statement_type and x$host_summary_by_statement_type views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • statement

    The final component of the statement event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • lock_latency

    The total time waiting for locks by timed occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • rows_affected

    The total number of rows affected by occurrences of the statement event for the host.

  • full_scans

    The total number of full table scans by occurrences of the statement event for the host.

25.4.3.7 The innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema Views

These views summarize the information in the INFORMATION_SCHEMA INNODB_BUFFER_PAGE table, grouped by schema. By default, rows are sorted by descending buffer size.

The innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_schema views have these columns:

  • object_schema

    The schema name for the object, or InnoDB System if the table belongs to the InnoDB storage engine.

  • allocated

    The total number of bytes allocated for the schema.

  • data

    The total number of data bytes allocated for the schema.

  • pages

    The total number of pages allocated for the schema.

  • pages_hashed

    The total number of hashed pages allocated for the schema.

  • pages_old

    The total number of old pages allocated for the schema.

  • rows_cached

    The total number of cached rows for the schema.

25.4.3.8 The innodb_buffer_stats_by_table and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_table Views

These views summarize the information in the INFORMATION_SCHEMA INNODB_BUFFER_PAGE table, grouped by schema and table. By default, rows are sorted by descending buffer size.

The innodb_buffer_stats_by_table and x$innodb_buffer_stats_by_table views have these columns:

  • object_schema

    The schema name for the object, or InnoDB System if the table belongs to the InnoDB storage engine.

  • object_name

    The table name.

  • allocated

    The total number of bytes allocated for the table.

  • data

    The number of data bytes allocated for the table.

  • pages

    The total number of pages allocated for the table.

  • pages_hashed

    The number of hashed pages allocated for the table.

  • pages_old

    The number of old pages allocated for the table.

  • rows_cached

    The number of cached rows for the table.

25.4.3.9 The innodb_lock_waits and x$innodb_lock_waits Views

These views summarize the InnoDB locks that transactions are waiting for. By default, rows are sorted by descending lock age.

The innodb_lock_waits and x$innodb_lock_waits views have these columns:

  • wait_started

    The time at which the lock wait started.

  • wait_age

    How long the lock has been waited for, as a TIME value.

  • wait_age_secs

    How long the lock has been waited for, in seconds.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • locked_table

    The name of the locked table. This column contains combined schema/table name values.

  • locked_index

    The name of the locked index.

  • locked_type

    The type of the waiting lock.

  • waiting_trx_id

    The ID of the waiting transaction.

  • waiting_trx_started

    The time at which the waiting transaction started.

  • waiting_trx_age

    How long the waiting transaction has been waiting, as a TIME value.

  • waiting_trx_rows_locked

    The number of rows locked by the waiting transaction.

  • waiting_trx_rows_modified

    The number of rows modified by the waiting transaction.

  • waiting_pid

    The processlist ID of the waiting transaction.

  • waiting_query

    The statement that is waiting for the lock.

  • waiting_lock_id

    The ID of the waiting lock.

  • waiting_lock_mode

    The mode of the waiting lock.

  • blocking_trx_id

    The ID of the transaction that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_pid

    The processlist ID of the blocking transaction.

  • blocking_query

    The statement the blocking transaction is executing.

  • blocking_lock_id

    The ID of the lock that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_lock_mode

    The mode of the lock that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_trx_started

    The time at which the blocking transaction started.

  • blocking_trx_age

    How long the blocking transaction has been executing, as a TIME value.

  • blocking_trx_rows_locked

    The number of rows locked by the blocking transaction.

  • blocking_trx_rows_modified

    The number of rows modified by the blocking transaction.

  • sql_kill_blocking_query

    The KILL statement to execute to kill the blocking statement.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • sql_kill_blocking_connection

    The KILL statement to execute to kill the session running the blocking statement.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

25.4.3.10 The io_by_thread_by_latency and x$io_by_thread_by_latency Views

These views summarize I/O consumers to display time waiting for I/O, grouped by thread. By default, rows are sorted by descending total I/O latency.

The io_by_thread_by_latency and x$io_by_thread_by_latency views have these columns:

  • user

    For foreground threads, the account associated with the thread. For background threads, the thread name.

  • total

    The total number of I/O events for the thread.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed I/O events for the thread.

  • min_latency

    The minimum single wait time of timed I/O events for the thread.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed I/O event for the thread.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed I/O events for the thread.

  • thread_id

    The thread ID.

  • processlist_id

    For foreground threads, the processlist ID of the thread. For background threads, NULL.

25.4.3.11 The io_global_by_file_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_file_by_bytes Views

These views summarize global I/O consumers to display amount of I/O, grouped by file. By default, rows are sorted by descending total I/O (bytes read and written).

The io_global_by_file_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_file_by_bytes views have these columns:

  • file

    The file path name.

  • count_read

    The total number of read events for the file.

  • total_read

    The total number of bytes read from the file.

  • avg_read

    The average number of bytes per read from the file.

  • count_write

    The total number of write events for the file.

  • total_written

    The total number of bytes written to the file.

  • avg_write

    The average number of bytes per write to the file.

  • total

    The total number of bytes read and written for the file.

  • write_pct

    The percentage of total bytes of I/O that were writes.

25.4.3.12 The io_global_by_file_by_latency and x$io_global_by_file_by_latency Views

These views summarize global I/O consumers to display time waiting for I/O, grouped by file. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The io_global_by_file_by_latency and x$io_global_by_file_by_latency views have these columns:

  • file

    The file path name.

  • total

    The total number of I/O events for the file.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed I/O events for the file.

  • count_read

    The total number of read I/O events for the file.

  • read_latency

    The total wait time of timed read I/O events for the file.

  • count_write

    The total number of write I/O events for the file.

  • write_latency

    The total wait time of timed write I/O events for the file.

  • count_misc

    The total number of other I/O events for the file.

  • misc_latency

    The total wait time of timed other I/O events for the file.

25.4.3.13 The io_global_by_wait_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_wait_by_bytes Views

These views summarize global I/O consumers to display amount of I/O and time waiting for I/O, grouped by event. By default, rows are sorted by descending total I/O (bytes read and written).

The io_global_by_wait_by_bytes and x$io_global_by_wait_by_bytes views have these columns:

  • event_name

    The I/O event name, with the wait/io/file/ prefix stripped.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the I/O event.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the I/O event.

  • min_latency

    The minimum single wait time of timed occurrences of the I/O event.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the I/O event.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the I/O event.

  • count_read

    The number of read requests for the I/O event.

  • total_read

    The number of bytes read for the I/O event.

  • avg_read

    The average number of bytes per read for the I/O event.

  • count_write

    The number of write requests for the I/O event.

  • total_written

    The number of bytes written for the I/O event.

  • avg_written

    The average number of bytes per write for the I/O event.

  • total_requested

    The total number of bytes read and written for the I/O event.

25.4.3.14 The io_global_by_wait_by_latency and x$io_global_by_wait_by_latency Views

These views summarize global I/O consumers to display amount of I/O and time waiting for I/O, grouped by event. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The io_global_by_wait_by_latency and x$io_global_by_wait_by_latency views have these columns:

  • event_name

    The I/O event name, with the wait/io/file/ prefix stripped.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the I/O event.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the I/O event.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the I/O event.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the I/O event.

  • read_latency

    The total wait time of timed read occurrences of the I/O event.

  • write_latency

    The total wait time of timed write occurrences of the I/O event.

  • misc_latency

    The total wait time of timed other occurrences of the I/O event.

  • count_read

    The number of read requests for the I/O event.

  • total_read

    The number of bytes read for the I/O event.

  • avg_read

    The average number of bytes per read for the I/O event.

  • count_write

    The number of write requests for the I/O event.

  • total_written

    The number of bytes written for the I/O event.

  • avg_written

    The average number of bytes per write for the I/O event.

25.4.3.15 The latest_file_io and x$latest_file_io Views

These views summarize file I/O activity, grouped by file and thread. By default, rows are sorted with most recent I/O first.

The latest_file_io and x$latest_file_io views have these columns:

  • thread

    For foreground threads, the account associated with the thread (and port number for TCP/IP connections). For background threads, the thread name and thread ID

  • file

    The file path name.

  • latency

    The wait time of the file I/O event.

  • operation

    The type of operation.

  • requested

    The number of data bytes requested for the file I/O event.

25.4.3.16 The memory_by_host_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_host_by_current_bytes Views

These views summarize memory use, grouped by host. By default, rows are sorted by descending amount of memory used.

The memory_by_host_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_host_by_current_bytes views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the client connected. Rows for which the HOST column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • current_count_used

    The current number of allocated memory blocks that have not been freed yet for the host.

  • current_allocated

    The current number of allocated bytes that have not been freed yet for the host.

  • current_avg_alloc

    The current number of allocated bytes per memory block for the host.

  • current_max_alloc

    The largest single current memory allocation in bytes for the host.

  • total_allocated

    The total memory allocation in bytes for the host.

25.4.3.17 The memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes Views

These views summarize memory use, grouped by thread. By default, rows are sorted by descending amount of memory used.

The memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_thread_by_current_bytes views have these columns:

  • thread_id

    The thread ID.

  • user

    The thread user or thread name.

  • current_count_used

    The current number of allocated memory blocks that have not been freed yet for the thread.

  • current_allocated

    The current number of allocated bytes that have not been freed yet for the thread.

  • current_avg_alloc

    The current number of allocated bytes per memory block for the thread.

  • current_max_alloc

    The largest single current memory allocation in bytes for the thread.

  • total_allocated

    The total memory allocation in bytes for the thread.

25.4.3.18 The memory_by_user_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_user_by_current_bytes Views

These views summarize memory use, grouped by user. By default, rows are sorted by descending amount of memory used.

The memory_by_user_by_current_bytes and x$memory_by_user_by_current_bytes views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • current_count_used

    The current number of allocated memory blocks that have not been freed yet for the user.

  • current_allocated

    The current number of allocated bytes that have not been freed yet for the user.

  • current_avg_alloc

    The current number of allocated bytes per memory block for the user.

  • current_max_alloc

    The largest single current memory allocation in bytes for the user.

  • total_allocated

    The total memory allocation in bytes for the user.

25.4.3.19 The memory_global_by_current_bytes and x$memory_global_by_current_bytes Views

These views summarize memory use, grouped by allocation type (that is, by event). By default, rows are sorted by descending amount of memory used.

The memory_global_by_current_bytes and x$memory_global_by_current_bytes views have these columns:

  • event_name

    The memory event name.

  • current_count

    The total number of occurrences of the event.

  • current_alloc

    The current number of allocated bytes that have not been freed yet for the event.

  • current_avg_alloc

    The current number of allocated bytes per memory block for the event.

  • high_count

    The high-water mark for number of memory blocks allocated for the event.

  • high_alloc

    The high-water mark for number of bytes allocated for the event.

  • high_avg_alloc

    The high-water mark for average number of bytes per memory block allocated for the event.

25.4.3.20 The memory_global_total and x$memory_global_total Views

These views summarize total memory use within the server.

The memory_global_total and x$memory_global_total views have these columns:

  • total_allocated

    The total bytes of memory allocated within the server.

25.4.3.21 The metrics View

This view summarizes MySQL server metrics to show variable names, values, types, and whether they are enabled. By default, rows are sorted by variable type and name.

This view was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

The metrics view includes this information:

  • Global status variables from the Performance Schema global_status table

  • InnoDB metrics from the INFORMATION_SCHEMA INNODB_METRICS table

  • Current and total memory allocation, based on the Performance Schema memory instrumentation

  • The current time (human readable and Unix timestamp formats)

There is some duplication of information between the global_status and INNODB_METRICS tables, which the metrics view eliminates.

The metrics view has these columns:

  • Variable_name

    The metric name. The metric type determines the source from which the name is taken:

    • For global status variables: The VARIABLE_NAME column of the global_status table

    • For InnoDB metrics: The NAME column of the INNODB_METRICS table

    • For other metrics: A view-provided descriptive string

  • Variable_value

    The metric value. The metric type determines the source from which the value is taken:

  • Type

    The metric type:

    • For global status variables: Global Status

    • For InnoDB metrics: InnoDB Metrics - %, where % is replaced by the value of the SUBSYSTEM column of the INNODB_METRICS table

    • For memory metrics: Performance Schema

    • For the current time: System Time

  • Enabled

    Whether the metric is enabled:

    • For global status variables: YES

    • For InnoDB metrics: YES if the STATUS column of the INNODB_METRICS table is enabled, NO otherwise

    • For memory metrics: NO, YES, or PARTIAL (currently, PARTIAL occurs only for memory metrics and indicates that not all memory/% instruments are enabled; Performance Schema memory instruments are always enabled)

    • For the current time: YES

25.4.3.22 The processlist and x$processlist Views

These views summarize processlist information. They provide more complete information than the SHOW PROCESSLIST statement and the INFORMATION_SCHEMA PROCESSLIST table, and are also nonblocking. By default, rows are sorted by descending process time and descending wait time.

The column descriptions here are brief. For additional information, see the description of the Performance Schema threads table at Section 24.10.16.3, “The threads Table”.

The processlist and x$processlist views have these columns:

  • thd_id

    The thread ID.

  • conn_id

    The connection ID.

  • user

    The thread user or thread name.

  • db

    The default database for the thread, or NULL if there is none.

  • command

    For foreground threads, the type of command the thread is executing on behalf of the client, or Sleep if the session is idle.

  • state

    An action, event, or state that indicates what the thread is doing.

  • time

    The time in seconds that the thread has been in its current state.

  • current_statement

    The statement the thread is executing, or NULL if it is not executing any statement.

  • statement_latency

    How long the statement has been executing.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • progress

    The percentage of work completed for stages that support progress reporting. See Section 25.3, “sys Schema Progress Reporting”.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • lock_latency

    The time spent waiting for locks by the current statement.

  • rows_examined

    The number of rows read from storage engines by the current statement.

  • rows_sent

    The number of rows returned by the current statement.

  • rows_affected

    The number of rows affected by the current statement.

  • tmp_tables

    The number of internal in-memory temporary tables created by the current statement.

  • tmp_disk_tables

    The number of internal on-disk temporary tables created by the current statement.

  • full_scan

    The number of full table scans performed by the current statement.

  • last_statement

    The last statement executed by the thread, if there is no currently executing statement or wait.

  • last_statement_latency

    How long the last statement executed.

  • current_memory

    The number of bytes allocated by the thread.

  • last_wait

    The name of the most recent wait event for the thread.

  • last_wait_latency

    The wait time of the most recent wait event for the thread.

  • source

    The source file and line number containing the instrumented code that produced the event.

  • trx_latency

    The wait time of the current transaction for the thread.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • trx_state

    The state for the current transaction for the thread.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • trx_autocommit

    Whether autocommit mode was enabled when the current transaction started.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • pid

    The client process ID.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

  • program_name

    The client program name.

    This column was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

25.4.3.23 The ps_check_lost_instrumentation View

This view returns information about lost Performance Schema instruments, to indicate whether the Performance Schema is unable to monitor all runtime data.

The ps_check_lost_instrumentation view has these columns:

  • variable_name

    The Performance Schema status variable name indicating which type of instrument was lost.

  • variable_value

    The number of instruments lost.

25.4.3.24 The schema_auto_increment_columns View

This view indicates which tables have AUTO_INCREMENT columns and provides information about those columns, such as the current and maximum column values and the usage ratio (ratio of used to possible values). By default, rows are sorted by descending usage ratio and maximum column value.

Tables in these schemas are excluded from view output: mysql, sys, INFORMATION_SCHEMA, performance_schema.

This view was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

The schema_auto_increment_columns view has these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table that contains the AUTO_INCREMENT column.

  • column_name

    The name of the AUTO_INCREMENT column.

  • data_type

    The data type of the column.

  • column_type

    The column type of the column, which is the data type plus possibly other information. For example, for a column with a bigint(20) unsigned column type, the data type is just bigint.

  • is_signed

    Whether the column type is signed.

  • is_unsigned

    Whether the column type is unsigned.

  • max_value

    The maximum permitted value for the column.

  • auto_increment

    The current AUTO_INCREMENT value for the column.

  • auto_increment_ratio

    The ratio of used to permitted values for the column. This indicates how much of the sequence of values is used up.

25.4.3.25 The schema_index_statistics and x$schema_index_statistics Views

These views provide index statistics. By default, rows are sorted by descending total index latency.

The schema_index_statistics and x$schema_index_statistics views have these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table that contains the index.

  • index_name

    The name of the index.

  • rows_selected

    The total number of rows read using the index.

  • select_latency

    The total wait time of timed reads using the index.

  • rows_inserted

    The total number of rows inserted into the index.

  • insert_latency

    The total wait time of timed inserts into the index.

  • rows_updated

    The total number of rows updated in the index.

  • update_latency

    The total wait time of timed updates in the index.

  • rows_deleted

    The total number of rows deleted from the index.

  • delete_latency

    The total wait time of timed deletes from the index.

25.4.3.26 The schema_object_overview View

This view summarizes the types of objects within each schema. By default, rows are sorted by schema and object type.

Note

For MySQL instances with a large number of objects, this view might take a long time to execute.

The schema_object_overview view has these columns:

  • db

    The schema name.

  • object_type

    The object type: BASE TABLE, INDEX (index_type), EVENT, FUNCTION, PROCEDURE, TRIGGER, VIEW.

  • count

    The number of objects in the schema of the given type.

25.4.3.27 The schema_redundant_indexes and x$schema_flattened_keys Views

The schema_redundant_indexes view displays indexes that duplicate other indexes or are made redundant by them. The x$schema_flattened_keys view is a helper view for schema_redundant_indexes.

These views were added in MySQL 5.7.9.

In the following column descriptions, the dominant index is the one that makes the redundant index redundant.

The schema_redundant_indexes view has these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table that contains the index.

  • redundant_index_name

    The name of the redundant index.

  • redundant_index_columns

    The names of the columns in the redundant index.

  • redundant_index_non_unique

    The number of nonunique columns in the redundant index.

  • dominant_index_name

    The name of the dominant index.

  • dominant_index_columns

    The names of the columns in the dominant index.

  • dominant_index_non_unique

    The number of nonunique columns in the dominant index.

  • subpart_exists

    Whether the index indexes only part of a column.

  • sql_drop_index

    The statement to execute to drop the redundant index.

The x$schema_flattened_keys view has these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table that contains the index.

  • index_name

    An index name.

  • non_unique

    The number of nonunique columns in the index.

  • subpart_exists

    Whether the index indexes only part of a column.

  • index_columns

    The name of the columns in the index.

25.4.3.28 The schema_table_lock_waits and x$schema_table_lock_waits Views

These views display which sessions are blocked waiting on metadata locks, and what is blocking them.

These views were added in MySQL 5.7.9.

The column descriptions here are brief. For additional information, see the description of the Performance Schema metadata_locks table at Section 24.10.12.1, “The metadata_locks Table”.

The schema_table_lock_waits and x$schema_table_lock_waits views have these columns:

  • object_schema

    The schema containing the object to be locked.

  • object_name

    The name of the instrumented object.

  • waiting_thread_id

    The thread ID of the thread that is waiting for the lock.

  • waiting_pid

    The processlist ID of the thread that is waiting for the lock.

  • waiting_account

    The account associated with the session that is waiting for the lock.

  • waiting_lock_type

    The type of the waiting lock.

  • waiting_lock_duration

    How long the waiting lock has been waiting.

  • waiting_query

    The statement that is waiting for the lock.

  • waiting_query_secs

    How long the statement has been waiting, in seconds.

  • waiting_query_rows_affected

    The number of rows affected by the statement.

  • waiting_query_rows_examined

    The number of rows read from storage engines by the statement.

  • blocking_thread_id

    The thread ID of the thread that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_pid

    The processlist ID of the thread that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_account

    The account associated with the thread that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_lock_type

    The type of lock that is blocking the waiting lock.

  • blocking_lock_duration

    How long the blocking lock has been held.

  • sql_kill_blocking_query

    The KILL statement to execute to kill the blocking statement.

  • sql_kill_blocking_connection

    The KILL statement to execute to kill the session running the blocking statement.

25.4.3.29 The schema_table_statistics and x$schema_table_statistics Views

These views summarize table statistics. By default, rows are sorted by descending total wait time (tables with most contention first).

These views user a helper view, x$ps_schema_table_statistics_io.

The schema_table_statistics and x$schema_table_statistics views have these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table name.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed I/O events for the table.

  • rows_fetched

    The total number of rows read from the table.

  • fetch_latency

    The total wait time of timed read I/O events for the table.

  • rows_inserted

    The total number of rows inserted into the table.

  • insert_latency

    The total wait time of timed insert I/O events for the table.

  • rows_updated

    The total number of rows updated in the table.

  • update_latency

    The total wait time of timed update I/O events for the table.

  • rows_deleted

    The total number of rows deleted from the table.

  • delete_latency

    The total wait time of timed delete I/O events for the table.

  • io_read_requests

    The total number of read requests for the table.

  • io_read

    The total number of bytes read from the table.

  • io_read_latency

    The total wait time of reads from the table.

  • io_write_requests

    The total number of write requests for the table.

  • io_write

    The total number of bytes written to the table.

  • io_write_latency

    The total wait time of writes to the table.

  • io_misc_requests

    The total number of miscellaneous I/O requests for the table.

  • io_misc_latency

    The total wait time of miscellaneous I/O requests for the table.

25.4.3.30 The schema_table_statistics_with_buffer and x$schema_table_statistics_with_buffer Views

These views summarize table statistics, including InnoDB buffer pool statistics. By default, rows are sorted by descending total wait time (tables with most contention first).

These views user a helper view, x$ps_schema_table_statistics_io.

The schema_table_statistics_with_buffer and x$schema_table_statistics_with_buffer views have these columns:

  • table_schema

    The schema that contains the table.

  • table_name

    The table name.

  • rows_fetched

    The total number of rows read from the table.

  • fetch_latency

    The total wait time of timed read I/O events for the table.

  • rows_inserted

    The total number of rows inserted into the table.

  • insert_latency

    The total wait time of timed insert I/O events for the table.

  • rows_updated

    The total number of rows updated in the table.

  • update_latency

    The total wait time of timed update I/O events for the table.

  • rows_deleted

    The total number of rows deleted from the table.

  • delete_latency

    The total wait time of timed delete I/O events for the table.

  • io_read_requests

    The total number of read requests for the table.

  • io_read

    The total number of bytes read from the table.

  • io_read_latency

    The total wait time of reads from the table.

  • io_write_requests

    The total number of write requests for the table.

  • io_write

    The total number of bytes written to the table.

  • io_write_latency

    The total wait time of writes to the table.

  • io_misc_requests

    The total number of miscellaneous I/O requests for the table.

  • io_misc_latency

    The total wait time of miscellaneous I/O requests for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_allocated

    The total number of InnoDB buffer bytes allocated for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_data

    The total number of InnoDB data bytes allocated for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_free

    The total number of InnoDB nondata bytes allocated for the table (innodb_buffer_allocatedinnodb_buffer_data).

  • innodb_buffer_pages

    The total number of InnoDB pages allocated for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_pages_hashed

    The total number of InnoDB hashed pages allocated for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_pages_old

    The total number of InnoDB old pages allocated for the table.

  • innodb_buffer_rows_cached

    The total number of InnoDB cached rows for the table.

25.4.3.31 The schema_tables_with_full_table_scans and x$schema_tables_with_full_table_scans Views

These views display which tables are being accessed with full table scans. By default, rows are sorted by descending rows scanned.

The schema_tables_with_full_table_scans and x$schema_tables_with_full_table_scans views have these columns:

  • object_schema

    The schema name.

  • object_name

    The table name.

  • rows_full_scanned

    The total number of rows scanned by full scans of the table.

  • latency

    The total wait time of full scans of the table.

25.4.3.32 The schema_unused_indexes View

These views display indexes for which there are no events, which indicates that they are not being used. By default, rows are sorted by schema and table.

This view is most useful when the server has been up and processing long enough that its workload is representative. Otherwise, presence of an index in this view may not be meaningful.

The schema_unused_indexes view has these columns:

  • object_schema

    The schema name.

  • object_name

    The table name.

  • index_name

    The unused index name.

25.4.3.33 The session and x$session Views

These views are similar to processlist and x$processlist, but they filter out background processes to display only user sessions. For descriptions of the columns, see Section 25.4.3.22, “The processlist and x$processlist Views”.

These views were added in MySQL 5.7.9.

25.4.3.34 The session_ssl_status View

For each connection, this view displays the SSL version, cipher, and count of reused SSL sessions.

This view was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

The session_ssl_status view has these columns:

  • thread_id

    The thread ID for the connection.

  • ssl_version

    The version of SSL used for the connection.

  • ssl_cipher

    The SSL cipher used for the connection.

  • ssl_sessions_reused

    The number of reused SSL sessions for the connection.

25.4.3.35 The statement_analysis and x$statement_analysis Views

These views list normalized statements with aggregated statistics. The content mimics the MySQL Enterprise Monitor Query Analysis view. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The statement_analysis and x$statement_analysis views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • full_scan

    The total number of full table scans performed by occurrences of the statement.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • err_count

    The total number of errors produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • warn_count

    The total number of warnings produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the statement.

  • lock_latency

    The total time waiting for locks by timed occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_sent_avg

    The average number of rows returned per occurrence of the statement.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_examined_avg

    The average number of rows read from storage engines per occurrence of the statement.

  • rows_affected

    The total number of rows affected by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_affected_avg

    The average number of rows affected per occurrence of the statement.

  • tmp_tables

    The total number of internal in-memory temporary tables created by occurrences of the statement.

  • tmp_disk_tables

    The total number of internal on-disk temporary tables created by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_sorted

    The total number of rows sorted by occurrences of the statement.

  • sort_merge_passes

    The total number of sort merge passes by occurrences of the statement.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

25.4.3.36 The statements_with_errors_or_warnings and x$statements_with_errors_or_warnings Views

These views display normalized statements that have produced errors or warnings. By default, rows are sorted by descending error and warning counts.

The statements_with_errors_or_warnings and x$statements_with_errors_or_warnings views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • errors

    The total number of errors produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • error_pct

    The percentage of statement occurrences that produced errors.

  • warnings

    The total number of warnings produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • warning_pct

    The percentage of statement occurrences that produced warnings.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

25.4.3.37 The statements_with_full_table_scans and x$statements_with_full_table_scans Views

These views display normalized statements that have done full table scans. By default, rows are sorted by descending percentage of time a full scan was done and descending total latency.

The statements_with_full_table_scans and x$statements_with_full_table_scans views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed statement events for the statement.

  • no_index_used_count

    The total number of times no index was used to scan the table.

  • no_good_index_used_count

    The total number of times no good index was used to scan the table.

  • no_index_used_pct

    The percentage of the time no index was used to scan the table.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned from the table.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from the storage engine for the table.

  • rows_sent_avg

    The average number of rows returned from the table.

  • rows_examined_avg

    The average number of rows read from the storage engine for the table.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

25.4.3.38 The statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile and x$statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile Views

These views list statements with runtimes in the 95th percentile. By default, rows are sorted by descending average latency.

Both views use two helper views, x$ps_digest_avg_latency_distribution and x$ps_digest_95th_percentile_by_avg_us.

The statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile and x$statements_with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • full_scan

    The total number of full table scans performed by occurrences of the statement.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • err_count

    The total number of errors produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • warn_count

    The total number of warnings produced by occurrences of the statement.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the statement.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_sent_avg

    The average number of rows returned per occurrence of the statement.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_examined_avg

    The average number of rows read from storage engines per occurrence of the statement.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

25.4.3.39 The statements_with_sorting and x$statements_with_sorting Views

These views list normalized statements that have performed sorts. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The statements_with_sorting and x$statements_with_sorting views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • sort_merge_passes

    The total number of sort merge passes by occurrences of the statement.

  • avg_sort_merges

    The average number of sort merge passes per occurrence of the statement.

  • sorts_using_scans

    The total number of sorts using table scans by occurrences of the statement.

  • sort_using_range

    The total number of sorts using range accesses by occurrences of the statement.

  • rows_sorted

    The total number of rows sorted by occurrences of the statement.

  • avg_rows_sorted

    The average number of rows sorted per occurrence of the statement.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

25.4.3.40 The statements_with_temp_tables and x$statements_with_temp_tables Views

These views list normalized statements that have used temporary tables. By default, rows are sorted by descending number of on-disk temporary tables used and descending number of in-memory temporary tables used.

The statements_with_temp_tables and x$statements_with_temp_tables views have these columns:

  • query

    The normalized statement string.

  • db

    The default database for the statement, or NULL if there is none.

  • exec_count

    The total number of times the statement has executed.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement.

  • memory_tmp_tables

    The total number of internal in-memory temporary tables created by occurrences of the statement.

  • disk_tmp_tables

    The total number of internal on-disk temporary tables created by occurrences of the statement.

  • avg_tmp_tables_per_query

    The average number of internal temporary tables created per occurrence of the statement.

  • tmp_tables_to_disk_pct

    The percentage of internal in-memory temporary tables that were converted to on-disk tables.

  • first_seen

    The time at which the statement was first seen.

  • last_seen

    The time at which the statement was most recently seen.

  • digest

    The statement digest.

25.4.3.41 The user_summary and x$user_summary Views

These views summarize statement activity, file I/O, and connections, grouped by user. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The user_summary and x$user_summary views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • statements

    The total number of statements for the user.

  • statement_latency

    The total wait time of timed statements for the user.

  • statement_avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed statement for the user.

  • table_scans

    The total number of table scans for the user.

  • file_ios

    The total number of file I/O events for the user.

  • file_io_latency

    The total wait time of timed file I/O events for the user.

  • current_connections

    The current number of connections for the user.

  • total_connections

    The total number of connections for the user.

  • unique_hosts

    The number of distinct hosts from which connections for the user have originated.

  • current_memory

    The current amount of allocated memory for the user.

  • total_memory_allocated

    The total amount of allocated memory for the user.

25.4.3.42 The user_summary_by_file_io and x$user_summary_by_file_io Views

These views summarize file I/O, grouped by user. By default, rows are sorted by descending total file I/O latency.

The user_summary_by_file_io and x$user_summary_by_file_io views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • ios

    The total number of file I/O events for the user.

  • io_latency

    The total wait time of timed file I/O events for the user.

25.4.3.43 The user_summary_by_file_io_type and x$user_summary_by_file_io_type Views

These views summarize file I/O, grouped by user and event type. By default, rows are sorted by user and descending total latency.

The user_summary_by_file_io_type and x$user_summary_by_file_io_type views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • event_name

    The file I/O event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the file I/O event for the user.

  • latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the file I/O event for the user.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the file I/O event for the user.

25.4.3.44 The user_summary_by_stages and x$user_summary_by_stages Views

These views summarize stages, grouped by user. By default, rows are sorted by user and descending total stage latency.

The user_summary_by_stages and x$user_summary_by_stages views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • event_name

    The stage event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the stage event for the user.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the stage event for the user.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the stage event for the user.

25.4.3.45 The user_summary_by_statement_latency and x$user_summary_by_statement_latency Views

These views summarize overall statement statistics, grouped by user. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency.

The user_summary_by_statement_latency and x$user_summary_by_statement_latency views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • total

    The total number of statements for the user.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed statements for the user.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed statements for the user.

  • lock_latency

    The total time waiting for locks by timed statements for the user.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by statements for the user.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by statements for the user.

  • rows_affected

    The total number of rows affected by statements for the user.

  • full_scans

    The total number of full table scans by statements for the user.

25.4.3.46 The user_summary_by_statement_type and x$user_summary_by_statement_type Views

These views summarize informaion about statements executed, grouped by user and statement type. By default, rows are sorted by user and descending total latency.

The user_summary_by_statement_type and x$user_summary_by_statement_type views have these columns:

  • user

    The client user name. Rows for which the USER column in the underlying Performance Schema table is NULL are assumed to be for background threads and are reported with a host name of background.

  • statement

    The final component of the statement event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • lock_latency

    The total time waiting for locks by timed occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • rows_sent

    The total number of rows returned by occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • rows_examined

    The total number of rows read from storage engines by occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • rows_affected

    The total number of rows affected by occurrences of the statement event for the user.

  • full_scans

    The total number of full table scans by occurrences of the statement event for the user.

25.4.3.47 The version View

This view provides the current sys schema and MySQL server versions.

The version view has these columns:

  • sys_version

    The sys schema version.

  • mysql_version

    The MySQL server version.

25.4.3.48 The wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency Views

These views summarize wait class average latencies, grouped by event class. By default, rows are sorted by descending average latency. Idle events are ignored.

An event class is determined by stripping from the event name everything after the first three components. For example, the class for wait/io/file/sql/slow_log is wait/io/file.

The wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_avg_latency views have these columns:

  • event_class

    The event class.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of events in the class.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

  • min_latency

    The minimum single wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of events in the class.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

25.4.3.49 The wait_classes_global_by_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_latency Views

These views summarize wait class total latencies, grouped by event class. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency. Idle events are ignored.

An event class is determined by stripping from the event name everything after the first three components. For example, the class for wait/io/file/sql/slow_log is wait/io/file.

The wait_classes_global_by_latency and x$wait_classes_global_by_latency views have these columns:

  • event_class

    The event class.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of events in the class.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

  • min_latency

    The minimum single wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of events in the class.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of events in the class.

25.4.3.50 The waits_by_host_by_latency and x$waits_by_host_by_latency Views

These views summarize wait events, grouped by host and event. By default, rows are sorted by host and descending total latency. Idle events are ignored.

The waits_by_host_by_latency and x$waits_by_host_by_latency views have these columns:

  • host

    The host from which the connection originated.

  • event

    The event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the event for the host.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the event for the host.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the event for the host.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the event for the host.

25.4.3.51 The waits_by_user_by_latency and x$waits_by_user_by_latency Views

These views summarize wait events, grouped by user and event. By default, rows are sorted by user and descending total latency. Idle events are ignored.

The waits_by_user_by_latency and x$waits_by_user_by_latency views have these columns:

  • user

    The user associated with the connection.

  • event

    The event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the event for the user.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the event for the user.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the event for the user.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the event for the user.

25.4.3.52 The waits_global_by_latency and x$waits_global_by_latency Views

These views summarize wait events, grouped by event. By default, rows are sorted by descending total latency. Idle events are ignored.

The waits_global_by_latency and x$waits_global_by_latency views have these columns:

  • events

    The event name.

  • total

    The total number of occurrences of the event.

  • total_latency

    The total wait time of timed occurrences of the event.

  • avg_latency

    The average wait time per timed occurrence of the event.

  • max_latency

    The maximum single wait time of timed occurrences of the event.

25.4.4 sys Schema Stored Procedures

The following sections describe sys schema stored procedures.

25.4.4.1 The create_synonym_db() Procedure

Given a schema name, this procedure creates a synonym schema containing views that refer to all the tables and views in the original schema. This can be used, for example, to create a shorter name by which to refer to a schema with a long name (such as info rather than INFORMATION_SCHEMA).

Parameters
  • in_db_name VARCHAR(64): The name of the schema for which to create the synonym.

  • in_synonym VARCHAR(64): The name to use for the synonym schema. This schema must not already exist.

Example
mysql> SHOW DATABASES;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| sys                |
| world              |
+--------------------+
mysql> CALL create_synonym_db('INFORMATION_SCHEMA', 'info');
+---------------------------------------+
| summary                               |
+---------------------------------------+
| Created 63 views in the info database |
+---------------------------------------+
mysql> SHOW DATABASES;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| info               |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| sys                |
| world              |
+--------------------+
mysql> SHOW FULL TABLES FROM info;
+---------------------------------------+------------+
| Tables_in_info                        | Table_type |
+---------------------------------------+------------+
| character_sets                        | VIEW       |
| collation_character_set_applicability | VIEW       |
| collations                            | VIEW       |
| column_privileges                     | VIEW       |
| columns                               | VIEW       |
...

25.4.4.2 The diagnostics() Procedure

Creates a report of the current server status for diagnostic purposes.

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

This procedure was added in MySQL 5.7.9. For MySQL 5.6, it requires MySQL 5.6.10 or higher. For MySQL 5.7, it requires MySQL 5.7.9 or higher.

Data collected for diagnostics() includes this information:

  • Information from the metrics view (see Section 25.4.3.21, “The metrics View”)

  • Information from other relevant sys schema views, such as the one that detemines queries in the 95th percentile

  • Information from the ndbinfo schema, if the MySQL server is part of MySQL Cluster

  • Replication status (both master and slave)

Some of the sys schema views are calculated as initial (optional), overall, and delta values:

  • The initial view is the content of the view at the start of the diagnostics() procedure. This output is the same as the start values used for the delta view. The initial view is included if the diagnostics.include_raw configuration option is ON.

  • The overall view is the content of the view at the end of the diagnostics() procedure. This output is the same as the end values used for the delta view. The overall view is always included.

  • The delta view is the difference from the beginning to the end of procedure execution. The minimum and maximum values are the minimum and maximum values from the end view, respectively. They do not necessarily reflect the minimum and maximum values in the monitored period. Except for the metrics view, the delta is calculated only between the first and last outputs.

Parameters
  • in_max_runtime INT UNSIGNED: The maximum data collection time in seconds. Use NULL to collect data for the default of 60 seconds. Otherwise, use a value greater than 0.

  • in_interval INT UNSIGNED: The sleep time between data collections in seconds. Use NULL to sleep for the default of 30 seconds. Otherwise, use a value greater than 0.

  • in_auto_config ENUM('current', 'medium', 'full'): The Performance Schema configuration to use. Permitted values are:

    • current: Use the current instrument and consumer settings.

    • medium: Enable some instruments and consumers.

    • full: Enable all instruments and consumers.

    Note

    The more instruments and consumers enabled, the more impact on MySQL server performance. Be careful with the medium setting and especially the full setting, which has a large performance impact.

    Use of the medium or full setting requires the SUPER privilege.

    If a setting other than current is chosen, the current settings are restored at the end of the procedure.

Configuration Options

diagnostics() operation can be modified using the following configuration options or their corresponding user-defined variables (see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”):

  • debug, @sys.debug

    If this option is ON, produce debugging output. The default is OFF.

  • diagnostics.allow_i_s_tables, @sys.diagnostics.allow_i_s_tables

    If this option is ON, the diagnostics() procedure is permitted to perform table scans on the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES table. This can be expensive if there are many tables. The default is OFF.

  • diagnostics.include_raw, @sys.diagnostics.include_raw

    If this option is ON, the diagnostics() procedure output includes the raw output from querying the metrics view. The default is OFF.

  • statement_truncate_len, @sys.statement_truncate_len

    The maximum length of statements returned by the format_statement() function. Longer statements are truncated to this length. The default is 64.

Example

Create a diagnostics report that starts an iteration every 30 seconds and runs for at most 120 seconds using the current Performance Schema settings:

mysql> CALL diagnostics(120, 30, 'current');

To capture the output from the diagnostics() procedure in a file as it runs, use the mysql client tee filename and notee commands (see Section 5.5.1.2, “mysql Commands”):

mysql> tee diag.out;
mysql> CALL diagnostics(120, 30, 'current');
mysql> notee;

25.4.4.3 The execute_prepared_stmt() Procedure

Given an SQL statement as a string, executes it as a prepared statement. The prepared statement is deallocated after execution, so it is not subject to reuse. Thus, this procedure is useful primarily for executing dynamic statements on a one-time basis.

This procedure uses sys_execute_prepared_stmt as the prepared statement name. If that statement name exists when the procedure is called, its previous content is destroyed.

This procedure was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_query LONGTEXT CHARACTER SET utf8: The statement string to execute.

Configuration Options

execute_prepared_stmt() operation can be modified using the following configuration options or their corresponding user-defined variables (see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”):

  • debug, @sys.debug

    If this option is ON, produce debugging output. The default is OFF.

Example
mysql> CALL execute_prepared_stmt('SELECT COUNT(*) FROM mysql.user');
+----------+
| COUNT(*) |
+----------+
|       15 |
+----------+

25.4.4.4 The ps_setup_disable_background_threads() Procedure

Disables Performance Schema instrumentation for all background threads. Produces a result set indicating how many background threads were disabled. Already disabled threads do not count.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_background_threads();
+--------------------------------+
| summary                        |
+--------------------------------+
| Disabled 24 background threads |
+--------------------------------+

25.4.4.5 The ps_setup_disable_consumer() Procedure

Disables Performance Schema consumers with names that contain the argument. Produces a result set indicating how many consumers were disabled. Already disabled consumers do not count.

Parameters
  • consumer VARCHAR(128): The value used to match consumer names, which are identified by using %consumer% as an operand for a LIKE pattern match.

    A value of '' matches all consumers.

Example

Disable all statement consumers:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_consumer('statement');
+----------------------+
| summary              |
+----------------------+
| Disabled 4 consumers |
+----------------------+

25.4.4.6 The ps_setup_disable_instrument() Procedure

Disables Performance Schema instruments with names that contain the argument. Produces a result set indicating how many instruments were disabled. Already disabled instruments do not count.

Parameters
  • in_pattern VARCHAR(128): The value used to match instrument names, which are identified by using %in_pattern% as an operand for a LIKE pattern match.

    A value of '' matches all instruments.

Example

Disable a specific instrument:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_instrument('wait/lock/metadata/sql/mdl');
+-----------------------+
| summary               |
+-----------------------+
| Disabled 1 instrument |
+-----------------------+

Disable all mutex instruments:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_instrument('mutex');
+--------------------------+
| summary                  |
+--------------------------+
| Disabled 177 instruments |
+--------------------------+

25.4.4.7 The ps_setup_disable_thread() Procedure

Given a connection ID, disables Performance Schema instrumentation for the thread. Produces a result set indicating how many threads were disabled. Already disabled threads do not count.

Parameters
  • in_connection_id BIGINT: The connection ID. This is a connection ID as given in the PROCESSLIST_ID column of the Performance Schema threads table or the Id column of SHOW PROCESSLIST output.

Example

Disable a specific connection by its connection ID:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_thread(225);
+-------------------+
| summary           |
+-------------------+
| Disabled 1 thread |
+-------------------+

Disable the current connection:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_disable_thread(CONNECTION_ID());
+-------------------+
| summary           |
+-------------------+
| Disabled 1 thread |
+-------------------+

25.4.4.8 The ps_setup_enable_background_threads() Procedure

Enables Performance Schema instrumentation for all background threads. Produces a result set indicating how many background threads were enabled. Already enabled threads do not count.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_background_threads();
+-------------------------------+
| summary                       |
+-------------------------------+
| Enabled 24 background threads |
+-------------------------------+

25.4.4.9 The ps_setup_enable_consumer() Procedure

Enables Performance Schema consumers with names that contain the argument. Produces a result set indicating how many consumers were enabled. Already enabled consumers do not count.

Parameters
  • consumer VARCHAR(128): The value used to match consumer names, which are identified by using %consumer% as an operand for a LIKE pattern match.

    A value of '' matches all consumers.

Example

Enable all statement consumers:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_consumer('statement');
+---------------------+
| summary             |
+---------------------+
| Enabled 4 consumers |
+---------------------+

25.4.4.10 The ps_setup_enable_instrument() Procedure

Enables Performance Schema instruments with names that contain the argument. Produces a result set indicating how many instruments were enabled. Already enabled instruments do not count.

Parameters
  • in_pattern VARCHAR(128): The value used to match instrument names, which are identified by using %in_pattern% as an operand for a LIKE pattern match.

    A value of '' matches all instruments.

Example

Enable a specific instrument:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_instrument('wait/lock/metadata/sql/mdl');
+----------------------+
| summary              |
+----------------------+
| Enabled 1 instrument |
+----------------------+

Enable all mutex instruments:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_instrument('mutex');
+-------------------------+
| summary                 |
+-------------------------+
| Enabled 177 instruments |
+-------------------------+

25.4.4.11 The ps_setup_enable_thread() Procedure

Given a connection ID, enables Performance Schema instrumentation for the thread. Produces a result set indicating how many threads were enabled. Already enabled threads do not count.

Parameters
  • in_connection_id BIGINT: The connection ID. This is a connection ID as given in the PROCESSLIST_ID column of the Performance Schema threads table or the Id column of SHOW PROCESSLIST output.

Example

Enable a specific connection by its connection ID:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_thread(225);
+------------------+
| summary          |
+------------------+
| Enabled 1 thread |
+------------------+

Enable the current connection:

mysql> CALL ps_setup_enable_thread(CONNECTION_ID());
+------------------+
| summary          |
+------------------+
| Enabled 1 thread |
+------------------+

25.4.4.12 The ps_setup_reload_saved() Procedure

Reloads a Performance Schema configuration saved earlier within the same session using ps_setup_save(). For more information, see the description of ps_setup_save().

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

Parameters

None.

25.4.4.13 The ps_setup_reset_to_default() Procedure

Resets the Performance Schema configuration to its default settings.

Parameters
  • in_verbose BOOLEAN: Whether to display information about each setup stage during procedure execution. This includes the SQL statements executed.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_reset_to_default(TRUE)\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
status: Resetting: setup_actors
DELETE
FROM performance_schema.setup_actors
WHERE NOT (HOST = '%' AND USER = '%' AND ROLE = '%')

*************************** 1. row ***************************
status: Resetting: setup_actors
INSERT IGNORE INTO performance_schema.setup_actors
VALUES ('%', '%', '%')

...

25.4.4.14 The ps_setup_save() Procedure

Saves the current Performance Schema configuration. This enables you to alter the configuration temporarily for debugging or other purposes, then restore it to the previous state by invoking the ps_setup_reload_saved() procedure.

To prevent other simultaneous calls to save the configuration, ps_setup_save() acquires an advisory lock named sys.ps_setup_save by calling the GET_LOCK() function. ps_setup_save() takes a timeout parameter to indicate how many seconds to wait if the lock already exists (which indicates that some other session has a saved configuration outstanding). If the timeout expires without obtaining the lock, ps_setup_save() fails.

It is intended you call ps_setup_reload_saved() later within the same session as ps_setup_save() because the configuration is saved in TEMPORARY tables. ps_setup_save() drops the temporary tables and releases the lock. If you end your session without invoking ps_setup_save(), the tables and lock disappear automatically.

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

Parameters
  • in_timeout INT: How many seconds to wait to obtain the sys.ps_setup_save lock. A negative timeout value means infinite timeout.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_save(10);

... make Performance Schema configuration changes ...

mysql> CALL ps_setup_reload_saved();

25.4.4.15 The ps_setup_show_disabled() Procedure

Displays all currently disabled Performance Schema configuration.

Parameters
  • in_show_instruments BOOLEAN: Whether to display disabled instruments. This might be a long list.

  • in_show_threads BOOLEAN: Whether to display disabled threads.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_disabled(TRUE, TRUE);
+----------------------------+
| performance_schema_enabled |
+----------------------------+
|                          1 |
+----------------------------+

+---------------+
| enabled_users |
+---------------+
| '%'@'%'       |
+---------------+

+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+
| object_type | objects              | enabled | timed |
+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+
| EVENT       | mysql.%              | NO      | NO    |
| EVENT       | performance_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| EVENT       | information_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| FUNCTION    | mysql.%              | NO      | NO    |
| FUNCTION    | performance_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| FUNCTION    | information_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| PROCEDURE   | mysql.%              | NO      | NO    |
| PROCEDURE   | performance_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| PROCEDURE   | information_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| TABLE       | mysql.%              | NO      | NO    |
| TABLE       | performance_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| TABLE       | information_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| TRIGGER     | mysql.%              | NO      | NO    |
| TRIGGER     | performance_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
| TRIGGER     | information_schema.% | NO      | NO    |
+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+

...

25.4.4.16 The ps_setup_show_disabled_consumers() Procedure

Displays all currently disabled Performance Schema consumers.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_disabled_consumers();
+----------------------------------+
| disabled_consumers               |
+----------------------------------+
| events_stages_current            |
| events_stages_history            |
| events_stages_history_long       |
| events_statements_history        |
| events_statements_history_long   |
| events_transactions_history      |
| events_transactions_history_long |
| events_waits_current             |
| events_waits_history             |
| events_waits_history_long        |
+----------------------------------+

25.4.4.17 The ps_setup_show_disabled_instruments() Procedure

Displays all currently disabled Performance Schema instruments. This might be a long list.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_disabled_instruments()\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
disabled_instruments: wait/synch/mutex/sql/TC_LOG_MMAP::LOCK_tc
               timed: NO
*************************** 2. row ***************************
disabled_instruments: wait/synch/mutex/sql/LOCK_des_key_file
               timed: NO
*************************** 3. row ***************************
disabled_instruments: wait/synch/mutex/sql/MYSQL_BIN_LOG::LOCK_commit
               timed: NO
...

25.4.4.18 The ps_setup_show_enabled() Procedure

Displays all currently enabled Performance Schema configuration.

Parameters
  • in_show_instruments BOOLEAN: Whether to display enabled instruments. This might be a long list.

  • in_show_threads BOOLEAN: Whether to display enabled threads.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_enabled(FALSE, FALSE);
+----------------------------+
| performance_schema_enabled |
+----------------------------+
|                          1 |
+----------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

+---------------+
| enabled_users |
+---------------+
| '%'@'%'       |
+---------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+
| object_type | objects              | enabled | timed |
+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+
| EVENT       | %.%                  | YES     | YES   |
| FUNCTION    | %.%                  | YES     | YES   |
| PROCEDURE   | %.%                  | YES     | YES   |
| TABLE       | %.%                  | YES     | YES   |
| TRIGGER     | %.%                  | YES     | YES   |
+-------------+----------------------+---------+-------+
5 rows in set (0.01 sec)

+-----------------------------+
| enabled_consumers           |
+-----------------------------+
| events_statements_current   |
| events_transactions_current |
| global_instrumentation      |
| thread_instrumentation      |
| statements_digest           |
+-----------------------------+

25.4.4.19 The ps_setup_show_enabled_consumers() Procedure

Displays all currently enabled Performance Schema consumers.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_enabled_consumers();
+-----------------------------+
| enabled_consumers           |
+-----------------------------+
| events_statements_current   |
| events_transactions_current |
| global_instrumentation      |
| thread_instrumentation      |
| statements_digest           |
+-----------------------------+

25.4.4.20 The ps_setup_show_enabled_instruments() Procedure

Displays all currently enabled Performance Schema instruments. This might be a long list.

Parameters

None.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_setup_show_enabled_instruments()\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
enabled_instruments: wait/io/file/sql/map
              timed: YES
*************************** 2. row ***************************
enabled_instruments: wait/io/file/sql/binlog
              timed: YES
*************************** 3. row ***************************
enabled_instruments: wait/io/file/sql/binlog_cache
              timed: YES
...

25.4.4.21 The ps_statement_avg_latency_histogram() Procedure

Displays a textual histogram graph of the average latency values across all normalized statements tracked within the Performance Schema events_statements_summary_by_digest table.

This procedure can be used to display a very high-level picture of the latency distribution of statements running within this MySQL instance.

Parameters

None.

Example

The histogram output in statement units. For example, * = 2 units in the histogram legend means that each * character represents 2 statements.

mysql> CALL ps_statement_avg_latency_histogram()\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
Performance Schema Statement Digest Average Latency Histogram:

  . = 1 unit
  * = 2 units
  # = 3 units

(0 - 66ms)     88  | #############################
(66 - 133ms)   14  | ..............
(133 - 199ms)  4   | ....
(199 - 265ms)  5   | **
(265 - 332ms)  1   | .
(332 - 398ms)  0   |
(398 - 464ms)  1   | .
(464 - 531ms)  0   |
(531 - 597ms)  0   |
(597 - 663ms)  0   |
(663 - 730ms)  0   |
(730 - 796ms)  0   |
(796 - 863ms)  0   |
(863 - 929ms)  0   |
(929 - 995ms)  0   |
(995 - 1062ms) 0   |

  Total Statements: 114; Buckets: 16; Bucket Size: 66 ms;

25.4.4.22 The ps_trace_statement_digest() Procedure

Traces all Performance Schema instrumentation for a specific statement digest.

If you find a statement of interest within the Performance Schema events_statements_summary_by_digest table, specify its DIGEST column MD5 value to this procedure and indicate the polling duration and interval. The result is a report of all statistics tracked within Performance Schema for that digest for the interval.

The procedure also attempts to execute EXPLAIN for the longest running example of the digest during the interval. This attempt might fail because the Performance Schema truncates long SQL_TEXT values. Consequently, EXPLAIN will fail due to parse errors.

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

Parameters
  • in_digest VARCHAR(32): The statement digest identifier to analyze.

  • in_runtime INT: How long to run the analysis in seconds.

  • in_interval DECIMAL(2,2): The analysis interval in seconds (which can be fractional) at which to try to take snapshots.

  • in_start_fresh BOOLEAN: Whether to truncate the Performance Schema events_statements_history_long and events_stages_history_long tables before starting.

  • in_auto_enable BOOLEAN: Whether to automatically enable required consumers.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_trace_statement_digest('891ec6860f98ba46d89dd20b0c03652c', 10, 0.1, TRUE, TRUE);
+--------------------+
| SUMMARY STATISTICS |
+--------------------+
| SUMMARY STATISTICS |
+--------------------+
1 row in set (9.11 sec)

+------------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+------------+
| executions | exec_time | lock_time | rows_sent | rows_examined | tmp_tables | full_scans |
+------------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+------------+
|         21 | 4.11 ms   | 2.00 ms   |         0 |            21 |          0 |          0 |
+------------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+------------+
1 row in set (9.11 sec)

+------------------------------------------+-------+-----------+
| event_name                               | count | latency   |
+------------------------------------------+-------+-----------+
| stage/sql/checking query cache for query |    16 | 724.37 us |
| stage/sql/statistics                     |    16 | 546.92 us |
| stage/sql/freeing items                  |    18 | 520.11 us |
| stage/sql/init                           |    51 | 466.80 us |
...
| stage/sql/cleaning up                    |    18 | 11.92 us  |
| stage/sql/executing                      |    16 | 6.95 us   |
+------------------------------------------+-------+-----------+
17 rows in set (9.12 sec)

+---------------------------+
| LONGEST RUNNING STATEMENT |
+---------------------------+
| LONGEST RUNNING STATEMENT |
+---------------------------+
1 row in set (9.16 sec)

+-----------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+-----------+
| thread_id | exec_time | lock_time | rows_sent | rows_examined | tmp_tables | full_scan |
+-----------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+-----------+
|    166646 | 618.43 us | 1.00 ms   |         0 |             1 |          0 |         0 |
+-----------+-----------+-----------+-----------+---------------+------------+-----------+
1 row in set (9.16 sec)

# Truncated for clarity...
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
| sql_text                                                        |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
| select hibeventhe0_.id as id1382_, hibeventhe0_.createdTime ... |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (9.17 sec)

+------------------------------------------+-----------+
| event_name                               | latency   |
+------------------------------------------+-----------+
| stage/sql/init                           | 8.61 us   |
| stage/sql/Waiting for query cache lock   | 453.23 us |
| stage/sql/init                           | 331.07 ns |
| stage/sql/checking query cache for query | 43.04 us  |
...
| stage/sql/freeing items                  | 30.46 us  |
| stage/sql/cleaning up                    | 662.13 ns |
+------------------------------------------+-----------+
18 rows in set (9.23 sec)

+----+-------------+--------------+-------+---------------+-----------+---------+-------------+------+-------+
| id | select_type | table        | type  | possible_keys | key       | key_len | ref         | rows | Extra |
+----+-------------+--------------+-------+---------------+-----------+---------+-------------+------+-------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | hibeventhe0_ | const | fixedTime     | fixedTime | 775     | const,const |    1 | NULL  |
+----+-------------+--------------+-------+---------------+-----------+---------+-------------+------+-------+
1 row in set (9.27 sec)

Query OK, 0 rows affected (9.28 sec)

25.4.4.23 The ps_trace_thread() Procedure

Dumps all Performance Schema data for an instrumented thread to a .dot formatted graph file (for the DOT graph description language). Each result set returned from the procedure should be used for a complete graph.

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

Parameters
  • in_thread_id INT: The thread to trace.

  • in_outfile VARCHAR(255): The name to use for the .dot output file.

  • in_max_runtime DECIMAL(20,2): The maximum number of seconds (which can be fractional) to collect data. Use NULL to collect data for the default of 60 seconds.

  • in_interval DECIMAL(20,2): The number of seconds (which can be fractional) to sleep between data collections. Use NULL to sleep for the default of 1 second.

  • in_start_fresh BOOLEAN: Whether to reset all Performance Schema data before tracing.

  • in_auto_setup BOOLEAN: Whether to disable all other threads and enable all instruments and consumers. This also resets the settings at the end of the run.

  • in_debug BOOLEAN: Whether to include file:lineno information in the graph.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_trace_thread(25, CONCAT('/tmp/stack-', REPLACE(NOW(), ' ', '-'), '.dot'), NULL, NULL, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE);
+-------------------+
| summary           |
+-------------------+
| Disabled 1 thread |
+-------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

+---------------------------------------------+
| Info                                        |
+---------------------------------------------+
| Data collection starting for THREAD_ID = 25 |
+---------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.03 sec)

+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| Info                                                      |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| Stack trace written to /tmp/stack-2014-02-16-21:18:41.dot |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (60.07 sec)

+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Convert to PDF                                                    |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
| dot -Tpdf -o /tmp/stack_25.pdf /tmp/stack-2014-02-16-21:18:41.dot |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (60.07 sec)

+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Convert to PNG                                                    |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
| dot -Tpng -o /tmp/stack_25.png /tmp/stack-2014-02-16-21:18:41.dot |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (60.07 sec)

+------------------+
| summary          |
+------------------+
| Enabled 1 thread |
+------------------+
1 row in set (60.32 sec)

25.4.4.24 The ps_truncate_all_tables() Procedure

Truncates all Performance Schema summary tables, resetting all aggregated instrumentation as a snapshot. Produces a result set indicating how many tables were truncated.

Parameters
  • in_verbose BOOLEAN: Whether to display each TRUNCATE TABLE statement before executing it.

Example
mysql> CALL ps_truncate_all_tables(FALSE);
+---------------------+
| summary             |
+---------------------+
| Truncated 44 tables |
+---------------------+

25.4.4.25 The statement_performance_analyzer() Procedure

Creates a report of the statements running on the server. The views are calculated based on the overall and/or delta activity.

This procedure requires the SUPER privilege because it manipulates the session sql_log_bin system variable to disable binary logging during its execution.

This procedure was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_action ENUM('snapshot', 'overall', 'delta', 'create_tmp', 'create_table', 'save', 'cleanup'): The action to take. These values are permitted:

    • snapshot: Store a snapshot. The default is to make a snapshot of the current content of the Performance Schema events_statements_summary_by_digest table. By setting in_table, this can be overwritten to copy the content of the specified table. The snapshot is stored in the sys schema tmp_digests temporary table.

    • overall: Generate an analysis based on the content of the table specified by in_table. For the overall analysis, in_table can be NOW() to use a fresh snapshot. This overwrites an existing snapshot. Use NULL for in_table to use the existing snapshot. If in_table is NULL and no snapshot exists, a new snapshot is created. The in_views parameter and the statement_performance_analyzer.limit configuration option affect the operation of this procedure.

    • delta: Generate a delta analysis. The delta is calculated between the reference table specified by in_table and the snapshot, which must exist. This action uses the sys schema tmp_digests_delta temporary table. The in_views parameter and the statement_performance_analyzer.limit configuration option affect the operation of this procedure.

    • create_table: Create a regular table suitable for storing the snapshot for later use (for example, for calculating deltas).

    • create_tmp: Create a temporary table suitable for storing the snapshot for later use (for example, for calculating deltas).

    • save: Save the snapshot in the table specified by in_table. The table must exist and have the correct structure. If no snapshot exists, a new snapshot is created.

    • cleanup: Remove the temporary tables used for the snapshot and delta.

  • in_table VARCHAR(129): The table parameter used for some of the actions specified by the in_action parameter. Use the format db_name.tbl_name or tbl_name without using any backtick (`) identifier-quoting characters. Periods (.) are not supported in database and table names.

    The meaning of the in_table value for each in_action value is detailed in the individual in_action value descriptions.

  • in_views SET ('with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile', 'analysis', 'with_errors_or_warnings', 'with_full_table_scans', 'with_sorting', 'with_temp_tables', 'custom'): Which views to include. This parameter is a SET value, so it can contain multiple view names, separated by commas. The default is to include all views except custom. The following values are permitted:

Configuration Options

statement_performance_analyzer() operation can be modified using the following configuration options or their corresponding user-defined variables (see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”):

  • debug, @sys.debug

    If this option is ON, produce debugging output. The default is OFF.

  • statement_performance_analyzer.limit, @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.limit

    The maximum number of rows to return for views that have no built-in limit. The default is 100.

  • statement_performance_analyzer.view, @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.view

    The custom query or view to be used. If the option value contains a space, it is interpreted as a query. Otherwise, it must be the name of an existing view that queries the Performance Schema events_statements_summary_by_digest table. There cannot be any LIMIT clause in the query or view definition if the statement_performance_analyzer.limit configuration option is greater than 0. If specifying a view, use the same format as for the in_table parameter. The default is NULL (no custom view defined).

    This option was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Example

To create a report with the queries in the 95th percentile since the last truncation of events_statements_summary_by_digest and with a one-minute delta period:

  1. Create a temporary table to store the initial snapshot.

  2. Create the initial snapshot.

  3. Save the initial snapshot in the temporary table.

  4. Wait one minute.

  5. Create a new snapshot.

  6. Perform analysis based on the new snapshot.

  7. Perform analysis based on the delta between the initial and new snapshots.

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('create_tmp', 'mydb.tmp_digests_ini', NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.08 sec)

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('snapshot', NULL, NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('save', 'mydb.tmp_digests_ini', NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> DO SLEEP(60);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (1 min 0.00 sec)

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('snapshot', NULL, NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('overall', NULL, 'with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile');
+-----------------------------------------+
| Next Output                             |
+-----------------------------------------+
| Queries with Runtime in 95th Percentile |
+-----------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.05 sec)

...

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('delta', 'mydb.tmp_digests_ini', 'with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile');
+-----------------------------------------+
| Next Output                             |
+-----------------------------------------+
| Queries with Runtime in 95th Percentile |
+-----------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.03 sec)

...

Create an overall report of the 95th percentile queries and the top 10 queries with full table scans:

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('snapshot', NULL, NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)                                 

mysql> SET @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.limit = 10;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)        

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('overall', NULL, 'with_runtimes_in_95th_percentile,with_full_table_scans');
+-----------------------------------------+
| Next Output                             |
+-----------------------------------------+
| Queries with Runtime in 95th Percentile |
+-----------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

...

+-------------------------------------+
| Next Output                         |
+-------------------------------------+
| Top 10 Queries with Full Table Scan |
+-------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.09 sec)

...

Use a custom view showing the top 10 queries sorted by total execution time, refreshing the view every minute using the watch command in Linux:

mysql> CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW mydb.my_statements AS
    -> SELECT sys.format_statement(DIGEST_TEXT) AS query,
    ->        SCHEMA_NAME AS db,
    ->        COUNT_STAR AS exec_count,
    ->        sys.format_time(SUM_TIMER_WAIT) AS total_latency,
    ->        sys.format_time(AVG_TIMER_WAIT) AS avg_latency,
    ->        ROUND(IFNULL(SUM_ROWS_SENT / NULLIF(COUNT_STAR, 0), 0)) AS rows_sent_avg,
    ->        ROUND(IFNULL(SUM_ROWS_EXAMINED / NULLIF(COUNT_STAR, 0), 0)) AS rows_examined_avg,
    ->        ROUND(IFNULL(SUM_ROWS_AFFECTED / NULLIF(COUNT_STAR, 0), 0)) AS rows_affected_avg,
    ->        DIGEST AS digest
    ->   FROM performance_schema.events_statements_summary_by_digest
    -> ORDER BY SUM_TIMER_WAIT DESC;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('create_table', 'mydb.digests_prev', NULL);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.10 sec)

shell> watch -n 60 "mysql sys --table -e \"
> SET @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.view = 'mydb.my_statements';
> SET @sys.statement_performance_analyzer.limit = 10;
> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('snapshot', NULL, NULL);
> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('delta', 'mydb.digests_prev', 'custom');
> CALL statement_performance_analyzer('save', 'mydb.digests_prev', NULL);
> \""

Every 60.0s: mysql sys --table -e "        ...  Mon Dec 22 10:58:51 2014

+----------------------------------+
| Next Output                      |
+----------------------------------+
| Top 10 Queries Using Custom View |
+----------------------------------+
+-------------------+-------+------------+---------------+-------------+---------------+-------------------+-------------------+----------------------------------+
| query             | db    | exec_count | total_latency | avg_latency | rows_sent_avg | rows_examined_avg | rows_affected_avg | digest                           |
+-------------------+-------+------------+---------------+-------------+---------------+-------------------+-------------------+----------------------------------+
...

25.4.4.26 The table_exists() Procedure

Tests whether a given table exists as a regular table, a TEMPORARY table, or a view. The procedure returns the table type in an OUT parameter. If both a temporary and a permanent table exist with the given name, TEMPORARY is returned.

This procedure was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_db VARCHAR(64): The name of the database in which to check for table existance.

  • in_table VARCHAR(64): The name of the table to check the existance of.

  • out_exists ENUM('', 'BASE TABLE', 'VIEW', 'TEMPORARY'): The return value. This is an OUT parameter, so it must be a variable into which the table type can be stored. When the procedure returns, the variable has one of the following values to indicate whether the table exists:

    • '': The table name does not exist as a base table, TEMPORARY table, or view.

    • BASE TABLE: The table name exists as a base (permanent) table.

    • VIEW: The table name exists as a view.

    • TEMPORARY: The table name exists as a TEMPORARY table.

Example
mysql> CREATE DATABASE db1;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql> USE db1;
Database changed
mysql> CREATE TABLE t1 (id INT PRIMARY KEY);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.03 sec)

mysql> CREATE TABLE t2 (id INT PRIMARY KEY);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.20 sec)

mysql> CREATE view v_t1 AS SELECT * FROM t1;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

mysql> CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE t1 (id INT PRIMARY KEY);
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

mysql> CALL sys.table_exists('db1', 't1', @exists); SELECT @exists;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.01 sec)

+-----------+
| @exists   |
+-----------+
| TEMPORARY |
+-----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> CALL sys.table_exists('db1', 't2', @exists); SELECT @exists;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

+------------+
| @exists    |
+------------+
| BASE TABLE |
+------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> CALL sys.table_exists('db1', 'v_t1', @exists); SELECT @exists;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)

+---------+
| @exists |
+---------+
| VIEW    |
+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> CALL sys.table_exists('db1', 't3', @exists); SELECT @exists;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

+---------+
| @exists |
+---------+
|         |
+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

25.4.5 sys Schema Stored Functions

The following sections describe sys schema stored functions.

25.4.5.1 The extract_schema_from_file_name() Function

Given a file path name, returns the path component that represents the schema name. This function assumes that the file name lies within the schema directory. For this reason, it will not work with partitions or tables defined using their own DATA_DIRECTORY table option.

This function is useful when extracting file I/O information from the Performance Schema that includes file path names. It provides a convenient way to display schema names, which can be more easily understood than full path names, and can be used in joins against object schema names.

Parameters
  • path VARCHAR(512): The full path to a data file from which to extract the schema name.

Return Value

A VARCHAR(64) value.

Example
mysql> SELECT extract_schema_from_file_name('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd');
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| extract_schema_from_file_name('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd') |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| world                                                                 |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.2 The extract_table_from_file_name() Function

Given a file path name, returns the path component that represents the table name.

This function is useful when extracting file I/O information from the Performance Schema that includes file path names. It provides a convenient way to display table names, which can be more easily understood than full path names, and can be used in joins against object table names.

Parameters
  • path VARCHAR(512): The full path to a data file from which to extract the table name.

Return Value

A VARCHAR(64) value.

Example
mysql> SELECT extract_table_from_file_name('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd');
+----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| extract_table_from_file_name('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd') |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| City                                                                 |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.3 The format_bytes() Function

Given a value in bytes, converts it to human-readable format and returns a string consisting of a value and a units indicator. Depending on the size of the value, the units part is bytes, KiB (kibibytes), MiB (mebibytes), GiB (gibibytes), TiB (tebibytes), or PiB (pebibytes).

Parameters
  • bytes TEXT: The bytes value to format.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT format_bytes(512), format_bytes(18446644073709551615);
+-------------------+------------------------------------+
| format_bytes(512) | format_bytes(18446644073709551615) |
+-------------------+------------------------------------+
| 512 bytes         | 16383.91 PiB                       |
+-------------------+------------------------------------+

25.4.5.4 The format_path() Function

Given a path name, returns the modified path name after replacing subpaths that match the values of the following system variables, in order:

datadir
tmpdir
slave_load_tmpdir
innodb_data_home_dir
innodb_log_group_home_dir
innodb_undo_directory
basedir

A value that matches the value of system variable sysvar is replaced with the string @@global.sysvar.

Prior to MySQL 5.7.14, backslashes in Windows path names are converted to forward slashes in the result.

Parameters
  • path VARCHAR(512): The path name to format.

Return Value

A VARCHAR(512) CHARACTER SET utf8 value.

Example
mysql> SELECT format_path('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd');
+-----------------------------------------------------+
| format_path('/usr/local/mysql/data/world/City.ibd') |
+-----------------------------------------------------+
| @@datadir/world/City.ibd                            |
+-----------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.5 The format_statement() Function

Given a string (normally representing an SQL statement), reduces it to the length given by the statement_truncate_len configuration option, and returns the result. No truncation occurs if the string is shorter than statement_truncate_len. Otherwise, the middle part of the string is replaced by an ellipsis (...).

This function is useful for formatting possibly lengthy statements retrieved from Performance Schema tables to a known fixed maximum length.

Parameters
  • statement LONGTEXT: The statement to format.

Configuration Options

format_statement() operation can be modified using the following configuration options or their corresponding user-defined variables (see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”):

  • statement_truncate_len, @sys.statement_truncate_len

    The maximum length of statements returned by the format_statement() function. Longer statements are truncated to this length. The default is 64.

Return Value

A LONGTEXT value.

Example

By default, format_statement() truncates statements to be no more than 64 characters. Setting @sys.statement_truncate_len changes the truncation length for the current session:

mysql> SET @stmt = 'SELECT variable, value, set_time, set_by FROM sys_config';
mysql> SELECT format_statement(@stmt);
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| format_statement(@stmt)                                  |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
| SELECT variable, value, set_time, set_by FROM sys_config |
+----------------------------------------------------------+
mysql> SET @sys.statement_truncate_len = 32;
mysql> SELECT format_statement(@stmt);
+-----------------------------------+
| format_statement(@stmt)           |
+-----------------------------------+
| SELECT variabl ... ROM sys_config |
+-----------------------------------+

25.4.5.6 The format_time() Function

Given a Performance Schema latency or wait time in picoseconds, converts it to human-readable format and returns a string consisting of a value and a units indicator. Depending on the size of the value, the units part is ns (nanoseconds), us (microseconds), ms (milliseconds), s (seconds), m (minutes), h (hours), d (days), or w (weeks).

Parameters
  • picoseconds TEXT: The picoseconds value to format.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT format_time(3501), format_time(188732396662000);
+-------------------+------------------------------+
| format_time(3501) | format_time(188732396662000) |
+-------------------+------------------------------+
| 3.50 ns           | 3.15 m                       |
+-------------------+------------------------------+

25.4.5.7 The list_add() Function

Adds a value to a comma-separated list of values and returns the result.

This function and list_drop() can be useful for manipulating the value of system variables such as sql_mode and optimizer_switch that take a comma-separated list of values.

This function was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_list TEXT: The list to be modified.

  • in_add_value TEXT: The value to add to the list.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT @@sql_mode;
+----------------------------------------+
| @@sql_mode                             |
+----------------------------------------+
| ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY,STRICT_TRANS_TABLES |
+----------------------------------------+
mysql> SET @@sql_mode = list_add(@@sql_mode, 'NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION');
mysql> SELECT @@sql_mode;
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| @@sql_mode                                                    |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY,STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
mysql> SET @@sql_mode = list_drop(@@sql_mode, 'ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY');
mysql> SELECT @@sql_mode;
+--------------------------------------------+
| @@sql_mode                                 |
+--------------------------------------------+
| STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION |
+--------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.8 The list_drop() Function

Removes a value from a comma-separated list of values and returns the result. For more information, see the description of list_add()

This function was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_list TEXT: The list to be modified.

  • in_drop_value TEXT: The value to drop from the list.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

25.4.5.9 The ps_is_account_enabled() Function

Returns YES or NO to indicate whether Performance Schema instrumentation for a given account is enabled.

Parameters
  • in_host VARCHAR(60): The host name of the account to check.

  • in_user VARCHAR(32): The user name of the account to check.

Return Value

An ENUM('YES','NO') value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_is_account_enabled('localhost', 'root');
+--------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_account_enabled('localhost', 'root') |
+--------------------------------------------+
| YES                                        |
+--------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.10 The ps_is_consumer_enabled() Function

Returns YES or NO to indicate whether a given Performance Schema consumer is enabled, or NULL if the argument is not a valid consumer name.

This function accounts for the consumer hierarchy, so a consumer is not considered enabled unless all consumers on which depends are also enabled. For information about the consumer hierarchy, see Section 24.3.7, “Pre-Filtering by Consumer”.

Parameters
  • in_consumer VARCHAR(64): The name of the consumer to check.

Return Value

An ENUM('YES','NO') value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_is_consumer_enabled('thread_instrumentation');
+--------------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_consumer_enabled('thread_instrumentation') |
+--------------------------------------------------+
| YES                                              |
+--------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.11 The ps_is_instrument_default_enabled() Function

Returns YES or NO to indicate whether a given Performance Schema instrument is enabled by default.

Parameters
  • in_instrument VARCHAR(128): The name of the instrument to check.

Return Value

An ENUM('YES','NO') value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_is_instrument_default_enabled('memory/innodb/row_log_buf');
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_instrument_default_enabled('memory/innodb/row_log_buf') |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| NO                                                            |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
mysql> SELECT ps_is_instrument_default_enabled('statement/sql/alter_user');
+--------------------------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_instrument_default_enabled('statement/sql/alter_user') |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+
| YES                                                          |
+--------------------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.12 The ps_is_instrument_default_timed() Function

Returns YES or NO to indicate whether a given Performance Schema instrument is timed by default.

Parameters
  • in_instrument VARCHAR(128): The name of the instrument to check.

Return Value

An ENUM('YES','NO') value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_is_instrument_default_timed('memory/innodb/row_log_buf');
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_instrument_default_timed('memory/innodb/row_log_buf') |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| NO                                                          |
+-------------------------------------------------------------+
mysql> SELECT ps_is_instrument_default_timed('statement/sql/alter_user');
+------------------------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_instrument_default_timed('statement/sql/alter_user') |
+------------------------------------------------------------+
| YES                                                        |
+------------------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.13 The ps_is_thread_instrumented() Function

Returns YES or NO to indicate whether Performance Schema instrumentation for a given connection ID is enabled, UNKNOWN if the ID is unknown, or NULL if the ID is NULL.

Parameters
  • in_connection_id BIGINT UNSIGNED: The connection ID. This is a connection ID as given in the PROCESSLIST_ID column of the Performance Schema threads table or the Id column of SHOW PROCESSLIST output.

Return Value

An ENUM('YES','NO','UNKNOWN') value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_is_thread_instrumented(43);
+-------------------------------+
| ps_is_thread_instrumented(43) |
+-------------------------------+
| UNKNOWN                       |
+-------------------------------+
mysql> SELECT ps_is_thread_instrumented(CONNECTION_ID());
+--------------------------------------------+
| ps_is_thread_instrumented(CONNECTION_ID()) |
+--------------------------------------------+
| YES                                        |
+--------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.14 The ps_thread_account() Function

Given a Performance Schema thread ID, returns the user_name@host_name account associated with the thread.

This function was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_thread_id BIGINT UNSIGNED: The thread ID for which to return the account. The value should match the THREAD_ID column from some Performance Schema threads table row.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_thread_account(ps_thread_id(CONNECTION_ID()));
+--------------------------------------------------+
| ps_thread_account(ps_thread_id(CONNECTION_ID())) |
+--------------------------------------------------+
| root@localhost                                   |
+--------------------------------------------------+

25.4.5.15 The ps_thread_id() Function

Returns the Performance Schema thread ID for a given connection ID, or the thread ID for the current connection if the connection ID is NULL.

Parameters
  • in_connection_id BIGINT UNSIGNED: The ID of the connection for which to return the thread ID. This is a connection ID as given in the PROCESSLIST_ID column of the Performance Schema threads table or the Id column of SHOW PROCESSLIST output.

Return Value

A BIGINT UNSIGNED value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_thread_id(260);
+-------------------+
| ps_thread_id(260) |
+-------------------+
|               285 |
+-------------------+

25.4.5.16 The ps_thread_stack() Function

Returns a JSON formatted stack of all statements, stages, and events within the Performance Schema for a given thread ID.

Parameters
  • in_thread_id BIGINT: The ID of the thread to trace. The value should match the THREAD_ID column from some Performance Schema threads table row.

  • in_verbose BOOLEAN: Whether to include file:lineno information in the events.

Return Value

A LONGTEXT CHARACTER SET latin1 value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_thread_stack(37, FALSE) AS thread_stack\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
thread_stack: {"rankdir": "LR","nodesep": "0.10",
"stack_created": "2014-02-19 13:39:03", "mysql_version": "5.7.3-m13",
"mysql_user": "root@localhost","events": [{"nesting_event_id": "0",
"event_id": "10", "timer_wait": 256.35, "event_info": "sql/select",
"wait_info": "select @@version_comment limit 1\nerrors: 0\nwarnings: 0\nlock time:
...

25.4.5.17 The ps_thread_trx_info() Function

Returns a JSON object containing information about a given thread. The information includes the current transaction, and the statements it has already executed, derived from the Performance Schema events_transactions_current and events_statements_history tables. (The consumers for those tables must be enabled to obtain full data in the JSON object.)

If the output exceeds the truncation length (65535 by default), a JSON error object is returned, such as:

{ "error": "Trx info truncated: Row 6 was cut by GROUP_CONCAT()" }

Similar error objects are returned for other warnings and exceptions raised during function execution.

This function was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters
  • in_thread_id BIGINT UNSIGNED: The thread ID for which to return transaction information. The value should match the THREAD_ID column from some Performance Schema threads table row.

Configuration Options

ps_thread_trx_info() operation can be modified using the following configuration options or their corresponding user-defined variables (see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”):

  • ps_thread_trx_info.max_length, @sys.ps_thread_trx_info.max_length

    The maximum length of the output. The default is 65535.

Return Value

A LONGTEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT ps_thread_trx_info(48)\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
ps_thread_trx_info(48): [
  {
    "time": "790.70 us",
    "state": "COMMITTED",
    "mode": "READ WRITE",
    "autocommitted": "NO",
    "gtid": "AUTOMATIC",
    "isolation": "REPEATABLE READ",
    "statements_executed": [
      {
        "sql_text": "INSERT INTO info VALUES (1, \'foo\')",
        "time": "471.02 us",
        "schema": "trx",
        "rows_examined": 0,
        "rows_affected": 1,
        "rows_sent": 0,
        "tmp_tables": 0,
        "tmp_disk_tables": 0,
        "sort_rows": 0,
        "sort_merge_passes": 0
      },
      {
        "sql_text": "COMMIT",
        "time": "254.42 us",
        "schema": "trx",
        "rows_examined": 0,
        "rows_affected": 0,
        "rows_sent": 0,
        "tmp_tables": 0,
        "tmp_disk_tables": 0,
        "sort_rows": 0,
        "sort_merge_passes": 0
      }
    ]
  },
  {
    "time": "426.20 us",
    "state": "COMMITTED",
    "mode": "READ WRITE",
    "autocommitted": "NO",
    "gtid": "AUTOMATIC",
    "isolation": "REPEATABLE READ",
    "statements_executed": [
      {
        "sql_text": "INSERT INTO info VALUES (2, \'bar\')",
        "time": "107.33 us",
        "schema": "trx",
        "rows_examined": 0,
        "rows_affected": 1,
        "rows_sent": 0,
        "tmp_tables": 0,
        "tmp_disk_tables": 0,
        "sort_rows": 0,
        "sort_merge_passes": 0
      },
      {
        "sql_text": "COMMIT",
        "time": "213.23 us",
        "schema": "trx",
        "rows_examined": 0,
        "rows_affected": 0,
        "rows_sent": 0,
        "tmp_tables": 0,
        "tmp_disk_tables": 0,
        "sort_rows": 0,
        "sort_merge_passes": 0
      }
    ]
  }
]

25.4.5.18 The quote_identifier() Function

Given a string argument, this function produces a quoted identifier suitable for inclusion in SQL statements. This is useful when a value to be used as an identifier is a reserved word or contains backtick (`) characters. It was added in MySQL 5.7.14.

Parameters

in_identifier TEXT: The identifier to quote.

Return Value

A TEXT value.

Example
mysql> SELECT quote_identifier('plain');
+---------------------------+
| quote_identifier('plain') |
+---------------------------+
| `plain`                   |
+---------------------------+
mysql> SELECT quote_identifier('trick`ier');
+-------------------------------+
| quote_identifier('trick`ier') |
+-------------------------------+
| `trick``ier`                  |
+-------------------------------+
mysql> SELECT quote_identifier('integer');
+-----------------------------+
| quote_identifier('integer') |
+-----------------------------+
| `integer`                   |
+-----------------------------+

25.4.5.19 The sys_get_config() Function

Given a configuration option name, returns the option value from the sys_config table, or the provided default value (which may be NULL) if the option does not exist in the table.

If sys_get_config() returns the default value and that value is NULL, it is expected that the caller is able to handle NULL for the given configuration option.

By convention, routines that call sys_get_config() first check whether the corresponding user-defined variable exists and is non-NULL. If so, the routine uses the variable value without reading the sys_config table. If the variable does not exist or is NULL, the routine reads the option value from the table and sets the user-defined variable to that value. For more information about the relationship between configuration options and their corresponding user-defined variables, see Section 25.4.2.1, “The sys_config Table”.

If you want to check whether the configuration option has already been set and, if not, use the return value of sys_get_config(), you can use IFNULL(...) (see example later). However, this should not be done inside a loop (for example, for each row in a result set) because for repeated calls where the assignment is needed only in the first iteration, using IFNULL(...) is expected to be significantly slower than using an IF (...) THEN ... END IF; block (see example later).

Parameters
  • in_variable_name VARCHAR(128): The name of the configuration option for which to return the value.

  • in_default_value VARCHAR(128): The default value to return if the configuration option is not found in the sys_config table.

Return Value

A VARCHAR(128) value.

Example

Get a configuration value from the sys_config table, falling back to 128 as the default if the option is not present in the table:

mysql> SELECT sys.sys_get_config('statement_truncate_len', 128) AS Value;
+-------+
| Value |
+-------+
| 64    |
+-------+

One-liner example: Check whether the option is already set; if not, assign the IFNULL(...) result (using the value from the sys_config table):

mysql> SET @sys.statement_truncate_len =
    -> IFNULL(@sys.statement_truncate_len,
    ->        sys.sys_get_config('statement_truncate_len', 64));

IF (...) THEN ... END IF; block example: Check whether the option is already set; if not, assign the value from the sys_config table:

IF (@sys.statement_truncate_len IS NULL) THEN
  SET @sys.statement_truncate_len = sys.sys_get_config('statement_truncate_len', 64);
END IF;

25.4.5.20 The version_major() Function

This function returns the major version of the MySQL server. It was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters

None.

Return Value

A TINYINT UNSIGNED value.

Example
mysql> SELECT VERSION(), version_major();
+-----------------+-----------------+
| VERSION()       | version_major() |
+-----------------+-----------------+
| 5.7.9-debug-log |               5 |
+-----------------+-----------------+

25.4.5.21 The version_minor() Function

This function returns the minor version of the MySQL server. It was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters

None.

Return Value

A TINYINT UNSIGNED value.

Example
mysql> SELECT VERSION(), version_minor();
+-----------------+-----------------+
| VERSION()       | version_minor() |
+-----------------+-----------------+
| 5.7.9-debug-log |               7 |
+-----------------+-----------------+

25.4.5.22 The version_patch() Function

This function returns the patch release version of the MySQL server. It was added in MySQL 5.7.9.

Parameters

None.

Return Value

A TINYINT UNSIGNED value.

Example
mysql> SELECT VERSION(), version_patch();
+-----------------+-----------------+
| VERSION()       | version_patch() |
+-----------------+-----------------+
| 5.7.9-debug-log |               9 |
+-----------------+-----------------+